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Basic Writings: Martin Heidegger

Routledge (1993)

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  1. A Brief History of Continental Realism.Lee Braver - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):261-289.
    This paper explains the nature and origin of what I am calling Transgressive Realism, a middle path between realism and anti-realism which tries to combine their strengths while avoiding their weaknesses. Kierkegaard created the position by merging Hegel’s insistence that we must have some kind of contact with anything we can call real (thus rejecting noumena), with Kant’s belief that reality fundamentally exceeds our understanding; human reason should not be the criterion of the real. The result is the idea that (...)
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  • Cinema as Mnemotechnics: Bernard Stiegler and the “Industrialization of Memory”.Ben Roberts - 2006 - Angelaki 11 (1):55 – 63.
  • Knowing, Being, and Wisdom: A Comparative Study.Yang Guorong - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):57-72.
  • Time, Event and Presence in the Late Heidegger.Françoise Dastur - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):399-421.
    The object of the paper is the attempt at retracing Heidegger’s conception of the relation of time and being from his major work “Being and Time” to the lecture he gave in 1962 on “Time and Being.” In order to explain the transformation of Heidegger’s thinking between 1927 and 1962, the emphasis is put on the new understanding of the oblivion of Being as belonging to the essence of Being itself, as well as on the analysis of the double meaning, (...)
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  • The Gravity of Steering, the Grace of Gliding and the Primordiality of Presencing Place: Reflections on Truthfulness, Worlding, Seeing, Saying and Showing in Practical Reasoning and Law. [REVIEW]Oren Ben-Dor - 2013 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):341-390.
    This article reflects on the received view of the rupture which constitutes the beginning of a critical, ethical, political and legal opening, the understanding of which inhabits the cry of, and response to, injustice. It takes the very critique that feeds into, and is distorted by, practical reasoning, as its point of departure. Grasping this rupture as the complementary relation between deconstruction and radical alterity, would entail unreflectively accepting a certain kind of truthfulness—truthfulness as [in]correctness, manifesting in a relationship that (...)
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  • God in Recent French Phenomenology.J. Aaron Simmons - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):910-932.
    In this essay, I provide an introduction to the so-called 'theological turn' in recent French, 'new' phenomenology. I begin by articulating the stakes of excluding God from phenomenology (as advocated by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger) and then move on to a brief consideration of why Dominique Janicaud contends that, by inquiring into the 'inapparent', new phenomenology is no longer phenomenological. I then consider the general trajectories of this recent movement and argue that there are five main themes that unite (...)
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  • Heidegger and Foucault: On the Relation Between the Anxiety–Engendering–Truth and Being-Towards-Freedom. [REVIEW]Aret Karademir - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (3):375-392.
    In his very last, now famous, interview, Michel Foucault states that his philosophical thought was shaped by his reading of Heidegger, even though he does not specify what aspects of Heidegger’s philosophy inspired him in the first place. However, his last interview is not the only place where Foucault refers to Heidegger as his intellectual guide. In his 1981/1982 lecture course, The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Foucault confesses that the way Heidegger conceptualized the relationship between subject and truth was a (...)
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  • Much Ado About Nothing: The Bergsonian and Heideggerian Roots of Sartre’s Conception of Nothingness.Gavin Rae - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (2):249-268.
    The question of nothingness occupies the thinking of a number of philosophers in the first half of the twentieth-century, with three of the most important responses being those of Henri Bergson, Martin Heidegger, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Surprisingly, however, there has been little discussion of their specific comments on nothingness either individually or comparatively. This paper starts to remedy this by suggesting that, while Bergson dismisses nothingness as a pseudo-problem based in a flawed metaphysical understanding, Heidegger, in What is Metaphysics?, claims (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Biomimicry.Henry Dicks - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 29 (3):223-243.
    The philosophy of biomimicry, I argue, consists of four main areas of inquiry. The first, which has already been explored by Freya Mathews, concerns the “deep” question of what Nature ultimately is. The second, third, and fourth areas correspond to the three basic principles of biomimicry as laid out by Janine Benyus. “Nature as model” is the poetic principle of biomimicry, for it tells us how it is that things are to be “brought forth”. “Nature as measure” is the ethical (...)
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  • Reclaiming Agency, Recovering Change? An Exploration of the Practice Theory of Theodore Schatzki.Raymond Caldwell - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (3):283-303.
  • Heidegger and the Essence of Dasein.Nate Zuckerman - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (4):493-516.
    Being and Time argues that we, as Dasein, are defined not by what we are, but by our way of existing, our “existentiell possibilities.” I diagnose and respond to an interpretive dilemma that arises from Heidegger's ambiguous use of this latter term. Most readings stress its specific sense, holding that Dasein has no general essence and is instead determined by some historically contingent way of understanding itself and the meaning of being at large. But this fails to explain the sense (...)
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  • The Corporeal Order of Things: The Spiel of Usability.Kurt Dauer Keller - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (2):173-204.
    Things make sense to us. The identity of a thing is a meaningful style that expresses the usability of the thing. The usability is a dynamic order of the praxis in which the thing is embedded and in which we are ourselves de-centered. According to Merleau-Ponty, this sociocultural and psychosocial order is a formation of practical understanding and interpretation that rests upon and resumes the elementary, perceptual-expressive structuring of being. The Spiel is one of the three dimensions of corporeal intentionality, (...)
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  • Enactive Appropriation.Tom Flint & Phil Turner - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (1):41-49.
  • Cultivating Ethos Through the Body.Seamus Carey - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (1):23-42.
    The paper lays the groundwork for understanding Heidegger's original ethics in the context of embodiment. I draw upon Merleau-Ponty's account of the flesh to develop a new ontology of embodiment as the basis for ethics. This ontology is formulated by integrating three unique accounts of the embodiment, namely, Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology, Yuasa Yasuo's Eastern-based phenomenology of the body, and the emerging science of Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). In each of these accounts of embodiment, the flesh is revealed as simultaneously consisting of presence and (...)
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  • What Does Heidegger Have to Do with an East-West Dialogue?Lin Ma - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):299-319.