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  1. Why Do Children Learn to Say “Broke”? A Model of Learning the Past Tense Without Feedback.Niels A. Taatgen & John R. Anderson - 2002 - Cognition 86 (2):123-155.
  • When Does Stress Help or Harm? The Effects of Stress Controllability and Subjective Stress Response on Stroop Performance.Roselinde K. Henderson, Hannah R. Snyder, Tina Gupta & Marie T. Banich - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Putting Some Feeling Into It--The Conceptual and Empirical Relationships Between the Classic and Emotional Stroop Tasks: Comment on Algom, Chajut, and Lev.Tim Dalgleish - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (4):585-591.
  • Posture-Based Motion Planning: Applications to Grasping.David A. Rosenbaum, Ruud J. Meulenbroek, Jonathan Vaughan & Chris Jansen - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):709-734.
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  • Modeling Parallelization and Flexibility Improvements in Skill Acquisition: From Dual Tasks to Complex Dynamic Skills.Niels Taatgen - 2005 - Cognitive Science 29 (3):421-455.
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  • On Adaptation, Maximization, and Reinforcement Learning Among Cognitive Strategies.Ido Erev & Greg Barron - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):912-931.
  • Transferability of Dual-Task Coordination Skills After Practice with Changing Component Tasks.Torsten Schubert, Roman Liepelt, Sebastian Kübler & Tilo Strobach - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • A Developmental Perspective in Learning the Mirror-Drawing Task.Mona Sharon Julius & Esther Adi-Japha - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Episodic Indexing: A Model of Memory for Attention Events.Erik M. Altmann & Bonnie E. John - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (2):117-156.
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  • Exemplar Effects in Categorization and Multiple-Cue Judgment.Peter Juslin, Henrik Olsson & Anna-Carin Olsson - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (1):133.
  • The 3 Faces of Clinical Reasoning: Epistemological Explorations of Disparate Error Reduction Strategies.Sandra Monteiro, Geoff Norman & Jonathan Sherbino - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (3):666-673.
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  • A Rational Look at the Emotional Stroop Phenomenon: A Generic Slowdown, Not a Stroop Effect.Daniel Algom, Eran Chajut & Shlomo Lev - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (3):323-338.
  • Implementing Flexibility in Automaticity: Evidence From Context-Specific Implicit Sequence Learning.Maria C. D’Angelo, Bruce Milliken, Luis Jiménez & Juan Lupiáñez - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):64-81.
    Attention is often dichotomized into controlled vs. automatic processing, where controlled processing is slow, flexible, and intentional, and automatic processing is fast, inflexible, and unintentional. In contrast to this strict dichotomy, there is mounting evidence for context-specific processes that are engaged rapidly yet are also flexible. In the present study we extend this idea to the domain of implicit learning to examine whether flexibility in automatic processes can be implemented through the reliance on contextual features. Across three experiments we show (...)
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  • Strengths and Weaknesses of Reflection as a Guide to Action: Pressure Assails Performance in Multiple Ways.Thomas H. Carr - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):227-252.
    The current status of Beilock and Carr's "execution focus" theory of choking under pressure in performance of a sensorimotor skill is reviewed and assessed, mainly from the perspective of cognitive psychology, and put into the context of a wider range of issues, attempting to take philosophical analysis into account. These issues include other kinds of skills, pre-performance practice, post-performance evaluation and repair, and integrating new and creative achievements into repertoires of heavily practiced routines. The focus is on variation in the (...)
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  • SSL: A Theory of How People Learn to Select Strategies.Jörg Rieskamp & Philipp E. Otto - 2006 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 135 (2):207-236.
  • Skill Acquisition and the LISP Tutor.John R. Anderson, Frederick G. Conrad & Albert T. Corbett - 1989 - Cognitive Science 13 (4):467-505.
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  • More on the Fragility of Performance: Choking Under Pressure in Mathematical Problem Solving.Sian L. Beilock, Catherine A. Kulp, Lauren E. Holt & Thomas H. Carr - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (4):584-600.
  • Is Science an Evolutionay Process? Evidence From Miscitation of the Scientific Literature.Kim J. Vicente - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (1):53-69.
    : This article describes a psychological test of Hull's (1988) theory of science as an evolutionary process by seeing if it can account for how scientists sometimes remember and cite the scientific literature. The conceptual adequacy of Hull's theory was evaluated by comparing it to Bartlett's (1932) seminal theory of human remembering. Bartlett found that remembering is an active, reconstructive process driven by a schema that biases recall in the direction of proto- typicality and personal involvement. This account supports Hull's (...)
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  • Skilled Anticipation in Real-World Tasks: Measurement of Attentional Demands in the Domain of Tennis.Richard M. Rowe & Frank P. McKenna - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7 (1):60.
  • Deliberate Trust and Intuitive Faith: A Dual‐Process Model of Reliance.Dustin S. Stoltz & Omar Lizardo - 2018 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 48 (2):230-250.
    Drawing on the dual process framework from social and cognitive psychology, this paper reconciles two distinct conceptualizations of trust prevalent in the literature: “rational” calculative and irrational “affective” or normative. After critically reviewing previous attempts at reconciliation between these distinctions, we argue that the notion of trust as “reliance” is the higher order category of which “deliberate trust” and “intuitive faith” are subtypes. Our revised approach problematizes the conflation of epistemic uncertainty with phenomenological uncertainty while providing sound footing for a (...)
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  • The Influence of Memory for Prior Instances on Performance in a Conflict Detection Task.Shayne Loft, Michael Humphreys & Andrew Neal - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (3):173-187.
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  • Can False Memory for Critical Lures Occur Without Conscious Awareness of List Words?Daniel D. Sadler, Sharon M. Sodmont & Lucas A. Keefer - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 58:136-157.
  • Processes Versus Representations: Cognitive Control as Emergent, Yet Componential.Eddy J. Davelaar - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):247-252.
    In this commentary, I focus on the difference between processes and representations and how this distinction relates to the question of what is controlled. Despite some views that task switching is a prototypical control process, the analysis concludes that task switching depends on the task goal representation and that control processes are there to prevent goal representations from disintegrating. Over time, these processes become obsolete, leaving behind a representation that automatically controls task performance. The distinction between processes and representations relates (...)
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  • Anchoring on Self and Others During Social Inferences.F. X. Willard Daniel & B. Markman Arthur - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):819-841.
    When making inferences about similar others, people anchor and adjust away from themselves. However, research on relational self theory suggests the possibility of using knowledge about others as an anchor when they are more similar to a target. We investigated whether social inferences are made on the basis of significant other knowledge through an anchoring and adjustment process, and whether anchoring on a significant other is more effortful than anchoring on the self. Participants answered questions about their likes and habits, (...)
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  • On the Nature of Automatically Triggered Approach–Avoidance Behavior.Regina Krieglmeyer, Jan De Houwer & Roland Deutsch - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (3):280-284.
    Theory suggests that stimulus evaluations automatically evoke approach–avoidance behavior. However, the extent to which approach–avoidance behavior is triggered automatically is not yet clear. Furthermore, the nature of automatically triggered approach–avoidance behavior is controversial. We review research on two views on the type of approach–avoidance behavior that is triggered automatically (arm flexion/extension, distance change). Present evidence supports the distance-change view and corroborates the notion of an automatic pathway from evaluation to distance-change behavior. We discuss underlying mechanisms (direct stimulus–response links, outcome anticipations, (...)
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  • A Biologically Plausible Action Selection System for Cognitive Architectures: Implications of Basal Ganglia Anatomy for Learning and Decision‐Making Models.Andrea Stocco - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):457-490.
    Several attempts have been made previously to provide a biological grounding for cognitive architectures by relating their components to the computations of specific brain circuits. Often, the architecture's action selection system is identified with the basal ganglia. However, this identification overlooks one of the most important features of the basal ganglia—the existence of a direct and an indirect pathway that compete against each other. This characteristic has important consequences in decision-making tasks, which are brought to light by Parkinson's disease as (...)
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  • Ten-Year-Old Children Strategies in Mental Addition: A Counting Model Account.Catherine Thevenot, Pierre Barrouillet, Caroline Castel & Kim Uittenhove - 2016 - Cognition 146:48-57.
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  • Instance‐Based Models of Metacognition in the Prisoner's Dilemma.Christopher A. Stevens, Niels A. Taatgen & Fokie Cnossen - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):322-334.
    In this article, we examine the advantages of simple metacognitive capabilities in a repeated social dilemma. Two types of metacognitive agent were developed and compared with a non-metacognitive agent and two fixed-strategy agents. The first type of metacognitive agent takes the perspective of the opponent to anticipate the opponent's future actions and respond accordingly. The other metacognitive agent predicts the opponent's next move based on the previous moves of the agent and the opponent. The modeler agent achieves better individual outcomes (...)
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  • Quantum Cognition and Bounded Rationality.Reinhard Blutner & Peter Beim Graben - 2016 - Synthese 193 (10).
    We consider several puzzles of bounded rationality. These include the Allais- and Ellsberg paradox, the disjunction effect, and related puzzles. We argue that the present account of quantum cognition—taking quantum probabilities rather than classical probabilities—can give a more systematic description of these puzzles than the alternate treatments in the traditional frameworks of bounded rationality. Unfortunately, the quantum probabilistic treatment does not always provide a deeper understanding and a true explanation of these puzzles. One reason is that quantum approaches introduce additional (...)
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  • Compatibility Between Physical Stimulus Size – Spatial Position and False Recognitions.Seda Dural, Birce B. Burhanoǧlu, Nilsu Ekinci, Emre Gürbüz, İdil U. Akın, Seda Can & Hakan Çetinkaya - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Intentional and Automatic Numerical Processing as Predictors of Mathematical Abilities in Primary School Children.Violeta Pina, Alejandro Castillo, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Luis J. Fuentes - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Asymptotic Learning of Alphanumeric Coding in Autobiographical Memory.Maryanne Martin & Gregory V. Jones - 2007 - Cognition 102 (2):311-320.
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  • Developing Intuition for Prices in Euros: Rescaling or Relearning Prices?J. Frederico Marques & Stanislas Dehaene - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (3):148-155.
  • Unconscious Task Application.Filip Opstavanl, Wim Gevers, Magda Osman & Tom Verguts - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):999-1006.
    The nature of unconscious information processing is a heavily debated issue in cognitive science , and neuroscience . Traditionally, it has been thought that unconscious cognitive processing is restricted to knowledge that is strongly prepared by conscious processes . In three experiments, we show that the task that is performed consciously can also be applied unconsciously to items outside the current task set. We found that a same–different judgment of two target stimuli was also performed on two subliminally presented prime (...)
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  • Using Video Game Telemetry Data to Research Motor Chunking, Action Latencies, and Complex Cognitive‐Motor Skill Learning.Joseph J. Thompson, C. M. McColeman, Ekaterina R. Stepanova & Mark R. Blair - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (2):467-484.
    Many theories of complex cognitive-motor skill learning are built on the notion that basic cognitive processes group actions into easy-to-perform sequences. The present work examines predictions derived from laboratory-based studies of motor chunking and motor preparation using data collected from the real-time strategy video game StarCraft 2. We examined 996,163 action sequences in the telemetry data of 3,317 players across seven levels of skill. As predicted, the latency to the first action is delayed relative to the other actions in the (...)
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  • Intimacy Effects on Action Regulation: Retrieval of Observationally Acquired Stimulus–Response Bindings in Romantically Involved Interaction Partners Versus Strangers.Carina Giesen, Virginia Löhl, Klaus Rothermund & Nicolas Koranyi - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • How Do Children Deal With Conflict? A Developmental Study of Sequential Conflict Modulation.Silvan F. A. Smulders, Eric L. L. Soetens & Maurits W. van der Molen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Criteria for the Design and Evaluation of Cognitive Architectures.Sashank Varma - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1329-1351.
    Cognitive architectures are unified theories of cognition that take the form of computational formalisms. They support computational models that collectively account for large numbers of empirical regularities using small numbers of computational mechanisms. Empirical coverage and parsimony are the most prominent criteria by which architectures are designed and evaluated, but they are not the only ones. This paper considers three additional criteria that have been comparatively undertheorized. (a) Successful architectures possess subjective and intersubjective meaning, making cognition comprehensible to individual cognitive (...)
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  • Spanning Seven Orders of Magnitude: A Challenge for Cognitive Modeling.John R. Anderson - 2002 - Cognitive Science 26 (1):85-112.
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  • Neural Pattern Similarity in the Left IFG and Fusiform Is Associated with Novel Word Learning.Qu Jing, Qian Liu, Chen Chuansheng, Xue Gui, Li Huiling, Xie Peng & Mei Leilei - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • A Neural Theory of Visual Attention: Bridging Cognition and Neurophysiology.Claus Bundesen, Thomas Habekost & Soren Kyllingsbæk - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (2):291-328.
  • In Search of Non-Abstract Representation of Numbers: Maybe on the Right Track, but Still Not There.Joseph Tzelgov & Michal Pinhas - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):353 - 354.
    We agree that the default numerical representation is best accessed by probing automatic processing. The locus of this representation is apparently at the horizontal intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the convergence zone of magnitude information. The parietal lobes are the right place to look for non-abstract representation of magnitude, yet the proof for that is still to be found.
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  • Computational Evidence for the Subitizing Phenomenon as an Emergent Property of the Human Cognitive Architecture.Scott A. Peterson & Tony J. Simon - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (1):93-122.
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  • Unconscious Task Application.Filip Van Opstal, Wim Gevers, Magda Osman & Tom Verguts - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):999-1006.
    The nature of unconscious information processing is a heavily debated issue in cognitive science, and neuroscience. Traditionally, it has been thought that unconscious cognitive processing is restricted to knowledge that is strongly prepared by conscious processes. In three experiments, we show that the task that is performed consciously can also be applied unconsciously to items outside the current task set. We found that a same–different judgment of two target stimuli was also performed on two subliminally presented prime stimuli. This was (...)
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  • Contingency Learning and Unlearning in the Blink of an Eye: A Resource Dependent Process.James R. Schmidt, Jan De Houwer & Derek Besner - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):235-250.
  • Explicit Pre-Training Instruction Does Not Improve Implicit Perceptual-Motor Sequence Learning.Daniel J. Sanchez & Paul J. Reber - 2013 - Cognition 126 (3):341-351.
  • Running the Number Line: Rapid Shifts of Attention in Single-Digit Arithmetic.Romain Mathieu, Audrey Gourjon, Auriane Couderc, Catherine Thevenot & Jérôme Prado - 2016 - Cognition 146:229-239.
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  • This Construction Needs Learned.Michael P. Kaschak & Arthur M. Glenberg - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (3):450-467.
  • Computational Models of Consciousness: An Evaluation.Ron Sun - 1999 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 9 (5-6):507-568.
  • Using Cognitive Agents to Train Negotiation Skills.Christopher A. Stevens, Jeroen Daamen, Emma Gaudrain, Tom Renkema, Jakob Dirk Top, Fokie Cnossen & Niels A. Taatgen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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