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  1. Knight's Moves: The Son-in-Law in Cicero and Tacitus.Emily Gowers - 2019 - Classical Antiquity 38 (1):2-35.
    While the relationship between fathers and sons, real or metaphorical, is still a dominant paradigm among classicists, this paper considers the rival contribution of Roman sons-in-law to the processes of collaboration and succession. It discusses the tensions, constraints, and obligations that soceri – generi relationships involved, then claims a significant role for sons-in-law in literary production. A new category is proposed here: “son-in-law literature,” with texts offered as recompense for a wife or her dowry, or as substitute funeral orations. Cicero (...)
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  • From Ponêêros to Pharmakos: Theater, Social Drama, and Revolution in Athens, 428-404 BCE.David Rosenbloom - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):283-346.
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  • The Eros of Alcibiades.Victoria Wohl - 1999 - Classical Antiquity 18 (2):349-385.
    Alcibiades is one of the most explicitly sexualized figures in fifth-century Athens, a "lover of the people" whom the demos "love and hate and long to possess" (Ar. Frogs 1425). But his eros fits ill with the normative sexuality of the democratic citizen as we usually imagine it. Simultaneously lover and beloved, effeminate and womanizer, Alcibiades is essentially paranomos, lawless or perverse. This paper explores the relation between Alcibiades' paranomia and the norms of Athenian sexuality, and argues that his eros (...)
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  • Eros Tyrannos: Alcibiades as the Model of the Tyrant in Book IX of the Republic.Annie Larivée - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (1):1-26.
    Abstract The aim of this article is to make use of recent research on `political eros ' in order to clarify the connection that Plato establishes between eros and tyranny in Republic IX, specifically by elucidating the intertextuality between Plato's work and the various historical accounts of Alcibiades. An examination of the lexicon used in these accounts will allow us to resolve certain interpretive difficulties that, to my knowledge, no other commentator has elucidated: why does Socrates blame eros for the (...)
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