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  1. Things Fall Apart: J. G. A. Pocock, Hannah Arendt, and the Politics of Time*: Mira L. Siegelberg.Mira L. Siegelberg - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):109-134.
    This article reconstructs J. G. A. Pocock's debt to Hannah Arendt's political philosophy in The Machiavellian Moment and argues that her presentation of classical politics in The Human Condition and her account of the secular nature of American foundation in On Revolution were important sources for Pocock's analysis of American liberal insecurity. However, a contextualization of The Machiavellian Moment within Pocock's immediate intellectual and professional milieu indicates that he placed himself in critical relation to Arendt's civic republican theory and located (...)
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  • Rethinking Arendt’s Theory of Necessity: Humanness as ‘Way of Life’, Or: The Ordinary as Extraordinary.John Lechte - 2018 - Theory, Culture and Society 35 (1):3-22.
    If genuine political activity can only be undertaken by citizens in the public sphere in a nation-state, what of stateless people today – asylum seekers and refugees cut adrift on the high seas? This is what is at stake in Hannah Arendt’s political theory of necessity. This article reconsiders Arendt’s notion of the Greek oikos as the sphere of necessity with the aim of challenging the idea that there is a condition of necessity or mere subsistence, where life is reduced (...)
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  • Disclosure and Responsibility in Arendt’s The Human Condition.Garrath Williams - 2015 - European Journal of Political Theory 14 (1):37-54.
    Hannah Arendt is one of the few philosophers to examine the dynamics of political action at length. Intriguingly, she emphasises the disclosure of who the actor is as a specific distinction of political action. This emphasis is connected with some long-standing worries about Arendt’s account that centre on its apparent unconcern for political responsibility. In this paper, I argue that Arendt’s emphasis on disclosure actually harbours a profound concern with responsibility. I do so by examining three questions. The main part (...)
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  • Hannah Arendt y los griegos: apuntes acerca de un malentendido.Edgar Straehle - 2018 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 51:81-98.
    El propósito de este artículo es profundizar en el pensamiento de Arendt y estudiar su interpretación del mundo griego, en diálogo con el estado actual de la historia de la antigua Grecia, en especial por lo que se refiere a los conceptos de acción, nomos y libertad, así como a la importancia del espacio político del ágora. Además, se tiene el objetivo de rebatir esa amplia recepción que le atribuye una suerte de ingenua grecomanía y de mostrar las limitaciones que (...)
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  • Action, an ‘Encompassing Ethic’ and Academics in the Midst of the Climate Crisis.Susan Plowright - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (14):1442-1451.
    In the midst of a crisis like the climate crisis and calls for ‘all hands on deck’, what do academics, as a microcosm of humanity, see? In Hannah Arendt’s terms, an ‘abyss of freedom’ to act or a paralysing ‘abyss of nothingness’? Some from the academy themselves, including Tamboukou, Apple and Bourdieu, make judgements more akin to the latter and mount arguments to urge action. This paper joins their call and theorises ethical and demonstrably plausible resources as a potentially generative (...)
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  • The Origin and Character of Hannah Arendt’s Theory of Judgment.David L. Marshall - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (3):367-393.
    Hannah Arendt's theory of judgment has been the object of considerable interest in the last three decades. Political theorists in particular have hoped to find in her theory of judgment a viable account of how diverse modern societies can sustain a commitment to dialogue in the absence of shared basic principles. A number of scholars, however, have critiqued Arendt's account of judgment in various ways. This article examines criticisms from Richard Bernstein, Ronald Beiner, George Kateb, Jürgen Habermas, and Linda Zerilli. (...)
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