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  1. Sicut Dei as Our Moral Vocation: Paul Valadier’s Rethinking of Nietzsche.Roshnee Ossewaarde-Lowtoo - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (3):196-213.
    In recent years, codes of ethics have been introduced in the banking sector and academia, or have been modified in reaction to recent developments and scandals; earlier on, bioethics commissions were set up to reflect on the ‘ethical’ implications of the so-called ‘sixth technology revolution.’ Yet, this frequent reference to morality and ethics by politicians, managers, medical professionals, technologists, scientists, and lobby groups is quite disquieting. Such moralism, it is argued in this article, not only misunderstands and overshadows the nature (...)
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  • Eternal Recurrence and Nihilism: Adding Weight to the Unbearable Lightness of Action.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - manuscript
    (Version 2.4) I have argued elsewhere for ascribing an error theory about all normative and evaluative judgements to Nietzsche. Such a nihilism brings with it a puzzle: how could we—or at least the select few of us being addressed by Nietzsche—continue in the face of this nihilism? This is a philosophical puzzle and so, defeasibly, an interpretive puzzle. If there is no theory it would make sense for Nietzsche to have about how the select few could go on, then this (...)
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  • Nietzsche and Amor Fati.Béatrice Han-Pile - 2011 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):224-261.
    Abstract: This paper identifies two central paradoxes threatening the notion of amor fati [love of fate]: it requires us to love a potentially repellent object (as fate entails significant negativity for us) and this, in the knowledge that our love will not modify our fate. Thus such love may seem impossible or pointless. I analyse the distinction between two different sorts of love (eros and agape) and the type of valuation they involve (in the first case, the object is loved (...)
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  • Death and Eternal Recurrence.Lars Bergström - 2013 - In Feldman Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. Oxford U P.
  • Will to Individuality: Nietzsche's Self-Interpreting Perspective on Life and Humanity.Kuo-Ping Claudia Tai - unknown
    This thesis aims to explore Nietzsche's concept of individuality. Nietzsche, a radical and innovative thinker who attacks Christian morality and proclaims the death of God, provides us with a self-interpreting way to understand humanity and affirm life through self-overcoming and self-experimentation. Nietzsche's concept of individuality is his main philosophical concern. I first compare his perspective on human nature in Human, All Too Human, Daybreak and Beyond Good and Evil with Charles Darwin's, Sigmund Freud's and St Augustine's in order to examine (...)
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  • How Not to Affirm One's Life: Nietzsche and the Paradoxical Task of Life Affirmation.Allison Merrick - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (1):63-78.
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  • On the Difficult Case of Loving Life: Plato's Symposium and Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence.Melanie Shepherd - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):519-539.
    ABSTRACTA simple but significant historical fact has been overlooked in interpretations of Nietzsche's eternal recurrence. In making eternal recurrence the standard for the affirmation and love of life, Nietzsche accepts an understanding of love developed in Plato's Symposium: love means ‘wanting to possess the good forever’. I argue that Plato develops two distinct types of love, which remain in tension with one another. I then show that a corresponding tension arises in Nietzsche's work when we consider eternal recurrence as the (...)
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  • “The End of Immortality!” Eternal Life and the Makropulos Debate.Mikel Burley - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):305-321.
    Responding to a well-known essay by Bernard Williams, philosophers have engaged in what I call “the Makropulos debate,” a debate over whether immortality—“living forever”—would be desirable for beings like us. Lacking a firm conceptual grounding in the religious contexts from which terms such as “immortality” and “eternal life” gain much of their sense, the debate has consisted chiefly in a battle of speculative fantasies. Having presented my four main reasons for this assessment, I examine an alternative and neglected conception, the (...)
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  • ‘Beginning Something New’: Control, Spontaneity and the Dancing Philosopher.Beverley Clack - 2014 - Sophia 53 (2):261-273.
    This paper suggests ways in which a philosophy modelled as dance provides the means of challenging political structures that emphasise control and constraint at the expense of spontaneity and creativity. Through combining Arendt’s claim that spontaneity is the quintessential human quality with Nietzsche’s modelling of philosophy as disruptive dancing, the possibilities of modelling philosophy as dance are explored. Envisaging philosophical practice in this way provides a corrective to the prioritising of certainty in philosophical method, thus enabling further reflection on what (...)
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  • Nietzsche, Mithras, and “Complete Heathendom”.Morgan Rempel - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):27-43.
    This paper examines several passages in which Nietzsche considers burgeoning Christianity’s relationship to the secretive “mystery cults” that flourished alongside the official state religions of ancient Rome. The purpose of this paper is four-fold. i) To shed light on an unexplored aspect of Nietzsche’s philosophy. ii) To explore the intellectual reality behind some of his specific charges concerning Pauline Christianity’s indebtedness to the ancient Mithras cult. iii) To assess the validity of several of Nietzsche’s accusations in this area in light (...)
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  • Books Received. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):621-631.
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  • Beyond Nursing Nihilism, a Nietzschean Transvaluation of Neoliberal Values.Pawel J. Krol & Mireille Lavoie - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (2):112-124.
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