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  1. Agnotology, Gender, and Engineering: An Emergent Typology.Kacey Beddoes - 2019 - Social Epistemology 33 (2):124-136.
    ABSTRACTThis article explores agnotology and ways of not knowing in the context of gender in engineering. It presents an empirically-emergent, three-part typology of ways of not knowing about gender based on interviews with engineering professors, and contributes to the growing body of scholarship on agnotology. Just as knowledge is inseparable from issues of power, so too are areas of non-knowledge, and it is important to understand how, and to what ends, non-knowing is produced. This analysis of the social construction of (...)
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  • Other People’s Problems: Student Distancing, Epistemic Responsibility, and Injustice.Matt S. Whitt - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (5):427-444.
    In classes that examine entrenched injustices like sexism or racism, students sometimes use “distancing strategies” to dissociate themselves from the injustice being studied. Education researchers argue that distancing is a mechanism through which students, especially students of apparent privilege, deny their complicity in systemic injustice. While I am sympathetic to this analysis, I argue that there is much at stake in student distancing that the current literature fails to recognize. On my view, distancing perpetuates socially sanctioned forms of ignorance and (...)
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  • Relational Knowing and Epistemic Injustice: Toward a Theory of Willful Hermeneutical Ignorance.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):715-735.
    I distinguish between two senses in which feminists have argued that the knower is social: 1. situated or socially positioned and 2. interdependent. I argue that these two aspects of the knower work in cooperation with each other in a way that can produce willful hermeneutical ignorance, a type of epistemic injustice absent from Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice. Analyzing the limitations of Fricker's analysis of the trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird with attention to the (...)
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  • Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]Christina Shaheen Moosa & Nancy Tuana - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):677-694.
  • Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror.Anna Mudde - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of reflection anew. Paying attention to (...)
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  • Climate Change Science and Responsible Trust: A Situated Approach.Heidi Grasswick - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):541-557.
    I adopt a situated approach to the question of what would constitute responsible trust and/or distrust in climate change science, and I identify some of the major challenges for laypersons in their attempts to know well by placing their trust in climate change experts. I examine evidence that white males, as a group of relative privilege, are more likely to distrust the institutions of climate change science than are other demographic groups, and use this example to consider specific challenges facing (...)
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