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Nietzsche’s Middle Period

Oxford University Press (2000)

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  1. Nietzsche’s Theory of Empathy.Vasfi O. Özen - 2021 - Philosophical Papers 50 (1-2):235-280.
    Nietzsche is not known for his theory of empathy. A quick skimming of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on empathy demonstrates this. Arthur Schopenhauer, Robert Vischer, and Theodor Lipps are among those whose views are considered representative, but Nietzsche has been simply forgotten in discussion of empathy. Nietzsche’s theory of empathy has not yet aroused sufficient interest among commentators. I believe that his views on this subject merit careful consideration. Nietzsche scholars have been interested in his naturalistic accounts of (...)
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  • Nietzsche on the passions and self-cultivation: contra the Stoics and Spinoza.Keith Ansell-Pearson - forthcoming - Continental Philosophy Review:1-21.
    Although the literature on Nietzsche is now voluminous one area where there has surprisingly been very little research concerns Nietzsche on the passions. This essay aims to correct this neglect. My focus is on illuminating Nietzsche on the passions in relation to his primary teaching on self-cultivation. To illuminate his position, I focus attention on examining his relation to Stoic teaching on the passions. If for Nietzsche the Christian mind-set involves a disturbing pathological excess of feeling, the Stoic way of (...)
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  • Fabricated Truths and the Pathos of Proximity: What Would Be a Nietzschean Philosophy of Contemporary Technoscience?Hub Zwart - 2019 - Foundations of Science 24 (3):457-482.
    In recent years, Nietzsche’s views on science attracted a considerable amount of scholarly attention. Overall, his attitude towards science tends to be one of suspicion, or ambivalence at least. My article addresses the “Nietzsche and science” theme from a slightly different perspective, raising a somewhat different type of question, more pragmatic if you like, namely: how to be a Nietzschean philosopher of science today? What would the methodological contours of a Nietzschean approach to present-day research areas amount to? In other (...)
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  • Beyond Compassion: On Nietzsche’s Moral Therapy in Dawn. [REVIEW]Keith Ansell-Pearson - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (2):179-204.
    In this essay I seek to show that a philosophy of modesty informs core aspects of both Nietzsche’s critique of morality and what he intends to replace morality with, namely, an ethics of self-cultivation. To demonstrate this I focus on Dawn: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality, a largely neglected text in his corpus where Nietzsche carries out a quite wide-ranging critique of morality, including Mitleid. It is one of Nietzsche’s most experimental works and is best read, I claim, as (...)
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  • Twilight of The Genealogy? Or a Genealogy of Twilight? Saving Nietzsche’s Internalization Hypothesis From Naïve Determinism.Brian Lightbody - 2021 - Philosophical Readings 13 (3):183-194.
    The Internalization Hypothesis (I.H.), as expressed in GM II 16 of On the Genealogy of Morals, is the essential albeit under-theorized principle of Nietzsche’s psychology. In the following essay, I investigate the purpose I.H. serves concerning Nietzsche’s theory of drives as well as the Hypothesis’s epistemic warrant. I demonstrate that I.H. needs a Neo-Darwinian underpinning for two reasons: 1) to answer the Time-Crunch Problem of Transformation, and 2) in order to render it coherent with Nietzsche’s physiological determinism as articulated in (...)
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  • Science, Culture, and Philosophy: The Relation Between Human, All Too Human and Nietzsche's Early Thought.Vinod Acharya - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):18-28.
    The goal of this article is to trace the transformations in Nietzsche's early thinking that led to the ideas published in Human, All Too Human, the first book of his mature philosophy. In contrast to his early works, in which he sides with art and philosophy in criticizing the scientific culture of his time, Nietzsche, in Human, All Too Human, hails the methodology of science as a way to overcome the metaphysical delusions of philosophy, art, and religion. However, in disagreement (...)
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  • Care of Self in Dawn: On Nietzsche’s Resistance to Bio-Political Modernity.Keith Ansell-Pearson - 2014 - In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. De Gruyter. pp. 269-286.
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  • Nietzsche's Critique of Pure Altruism—Developing an Argument From Human, All Too Human.Guy Elgat - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):308-326.
    Nietzsche often appears, especially in his writings from the middle period, to endorse psychological egoism, namely the claim that all actions are motivated by, and are for the sake of, the agent’s own self-interest. I argue that Nietzsche’s position in Human, All Too Human should not be so understood. Rather, he is claiming, more weakly and more plausibly, that no action is entirely unegoistic, entirely free of egoistic motivations. Thus some actions might be motivated both by egoistic and unegoistic motives, (...)
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  • A Religião Como Má Interpretação Do Sofrimento No Humano, Demasiado Humano, de Nietzsche.Jelson Roberto de Oliveira - 2013 - Dissertatio 38:97-120.
    O objetivo do presente artigo é analisar a argumentação segundo a qual Nietzsche interpreta como a necessidade metafísica nasce de uma tentativa de fuga da dor e do sofrimento que marca a vida e que, no final, acaba por representar não só uma má-interpretação das coisas humanas, mas uma tentativa de cura que resulta, secundariamente, no impedimento da “verdadeira” cura, aquela proposta por Nietzsche no seu procedimento filosófico-científico1 que conduz à retomada da inocência.
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