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  1. The Exposed Self: A Multilevel Model of Shame and Ethical Behavior.Steven A. Murphy & Sandra Kiffin-Petersen - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (4):657-675.
    In this article, we review the shame and ethical behavior literature in order to more fully develop theory and testable propositions for organizational scholars focusing on the behavioral implications of this ‘moral’ emotion. We propose a dual pathway multilevel model that incorporates complex relationships between felt and anticipatory shame processes and ethical behavior, both within and between persons and at the collective level. We propose a holistic treatment of shame that includes dispositional and organizational influences on the cognitive and emotional (...)
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  • The Simulation of Emotion Experience: On the Emotional Foundations of Theory of Mind. [REVIEW]Lisbeth Nielsen - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):255-286.
    An argument is developed that supports a simulationist account about the foundations of infants' and young children's understanding that other people have mental states. This argument relies on evidence that infants come to the world with capacities to send and receive affective cues and to appreciate the emotional states of others – capacities well suited to a social environment initially made up of frequent and extended emotional interactions with their caregivers. The central premise of the argument is that the foundation (...)
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  • Emotion Knowledge, Emotion Utilization, and Emotion Regulation.Carroll E. Izard, Elizabeth M. Woodburn, Kristy J. Finlon, E. Stephanie Krauthamer-Ewing, Stacy R. Grossman & Adina Seidenfeld - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):44-52.
    This article suggests a way to circumvent some of the problems that follow from the lack of consensus on a definition of emotion (Izard, 2010; Kleinginna & Kleinginna, 1981) and emotion regulation (Cole, Martin, & Dennis, 2004) by adopting a conceptual framework based on discrete emotions theory and focusing on specific emotions. Discrete emotions theories assume that neural, affective, and cognitive processes differ across specific emotions and that each emotion has particular motivational and regulatory functions. Thus, efforts at regulation should (...)
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  • Differential Emotions Theory as a Theory of Personality Development.J. A. A. Abe - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):126-130.
    In The Face of Emotions, which was Carroll Izard’s first major attempt at elaborating his differential emotions theory, he stated that the book “presents a theoretical framework for the study of emotions and their role in personality and interpersonal processes.” Yet, over the years, his contribution to personality theory has generally been overshadowed by the attention focused on his views on facial expressions and the structure of emotions. This article will begin with a brief overview of the DET perspective on (...)
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  • Facial Expression of Pain: An Evolutionary Account.Amanda C. De C. Williams - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):439-455.
    This paper proposes that human expression of pain in the presence or absence of caregivers, and the detection of pain by observers, arises from evolved propensities. The function of pain is to demand attention and prioritise escape, recovery, and healing; where others can help achieve these goals, effective communication of pain is required. Evidence is reviewed of a distinct and specific facial expression of pain from infancy to old age, consistent across stimuli, and recognizable as pain by observers. Voluntary control (...)
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  • Are the Sources of Interest the Same for Everyone? Using Multilevel Mixture Models to Explore Individual Differences in Appraisal Structures.Paul J. Silvia, Robert A. Henson & Jonathan L. Templin - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1389-1406.