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  1. The Past, History, and Corporate Social Responsibility.Robert Phillips, Judith Schrempf-Stirling & Christian Stutz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):203-213.
    An emerging body of research recognizes the importance of the past and history for corporate social responsibility scholarship and practice. However, the meanings that scholars and practitioners can ascribe to the past and history differ fundamentally, posing challenges to the integration of history and CSR thinking. This essay reviews diverse approaches and proposes a broad conceptualization of the relationship between the past, history, and CSR. We suggest historical CSR as an umbrella term that comprises three distinct theoretical perspectives. The “past-of-CSR” (...)
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  • Using Versus Excusing: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Long-Term Engagement with Its (Problematic) Past.Wim Van Lent & Andrew D. Smith - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):215-231.
    Increased scrutiny of corporate legitimacy has sparked an interest in “historic corporate social responsibility”, or the mechanism through which firms take responsibility for past misdeeds. Extant theory on historic CSR implicitly treats corporate engagement with historical criticism as intentional and dichotomous, with firms choosing either a limited or a high engagement strategy. However, this conceptualization is puzzling because a firm’s engagement with historic claims involves organizational practices that managers don’t necessarily control; hence, it might materialize differently than anticipated. Furthermore, multiple (...)
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  • Navigating Between the Plots: A Narratological and Ethical Analysis of Business-Related Conspiracy Theories.Mathieu Alemany Oliver - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    This paper introduces the concept of business-related conspiracy theories. Drawing on Aristotelian virtue ethics and undertaking a narratological and ethical analysis of 28 BrCTs found online, I emphasize that BrCTs are narratives with structures rooted in other latent macro- and meta-narratives, including centuries-old myths. In particular, I reconstruct the fictional world of BrCTs – one in which CSR and social contracts have failed – before identifying eight different types of actors as which people can morally situate themselves in their relationships (...)
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