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  1. Do robots dream of escaping? Narrativity and ethics in Alex Garland’s Ex-Machina and Luke Scott’s Morgan.Inbar Kaminsky - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (1):349-359.
    Ex-Machina and Morgan, two recent science-fiction films that deal with the creation of humanoids, also explored the relationship between artificial intelligence, spatiality and the lingering question mark regarding artificial consciousness. In both narratives, the creators of the humanoids have tried to mimic human consciousness as closely as possible, which has resulted in the imprisonment of the humanoids due to proprietary concerns in Ex-Machina and due to the violent behavior of the humanoid in Morgan. This article addresses the dilemma of whether (...)
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  • The Effect of Dynamic Social Material Conditions on Cognition in the Biomedical Research Laboratory.Chris Goldsworthy - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (1):241-257.
    The modern biomedical research laboratory is increasingly defined by dynamic social material conditions requiring researchers to traverse multiple shifting cognitive ecologies within day-to-day practice. Although the complexity of biomedical research is well known, the mechanisms by which the social and material organisation of this space is negotiated has yet to be fully considered. Integrating insights from Material Engagement Theory and Enactive Cognition with observations undertaken within a biomedical research laboratory, this paper develops an understanding of how actors are able to (...)
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  • Cylons, Gaylons and Gay Grammar. [REVIEW]Yuval Marton - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (4):553-557.
  • Who Gets to Choose? On the Socio-Algorithmic Construction of Choice.Dan M. Kotliar - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (2):346-375.
    This article deals with choice-inducing algorithms––algorithms that are explicitly designed to affect people’s choices. Based on an ethnographic account of three Israeli data analytics companies, I explore how algorithms are being designed to drive people into choice-making and examine their co-constitution by an assemblage of specifically positioned human and nonhuman agents. I show that the functioning, logic, and even ethics of choice-inducing algorithms are deeply influenced by the epistemologies, meaning systems, and practices of the individuals who devise and use them (...)
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  • Mind Scripting: A Method for Deconstructive Design.Doris Allhutter - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (6):684-707.
    The interventionist turn in science and technology studies increasingly involves researchers with practices of technology development and thus entails the need for appropriate methodologies. Based in software engineering, this article introduces the deconstructive technique of “mind scripting” as a method for analyzing processes of the co-materialization of gender and technology and as a tool to support cooperative, reflective work practices. Anchored in critical design approaches, “mind scripting” is a means for development teams to disclose discourses implicitly guiding work practices in (...)
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  • Animation and Automation – The Liveliness and Labours of Bodies and Machines.Lucy Suchman & Jackie Stacey - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (1):1-46.
    Written as the introduction to a special issue of Body & Society on the topic of animation and automation, this article considers the interrelation of those two terms through readings of relevant work in film studies and science and technology studies, inflected through recent scholarship on the body. Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples, we trace how movement is taken as a sign of life, while living bodies are translated through the mechanisms of artifice. Whereas film studies has drawn upon (...)
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  • Feminist Conversations with Vicki Kirby and Elizabeth A. Wilson.Elizabeth A. Wilson & Vicki Kirby - 2011 - Feminist Theory 12 (2):227-234.
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  • Digital Feminicity: Predication and Measurement, Materialist Informatics and Images.Felicity Colman - 2014 - Journal of Art, Science, and Technology 14:7-17.
    “Feminicity” is the term for a predicate register that enables feminist work be accounted for as relational “active-points” that collectively can be seen through what they have achieved. But going further, it marks where those active-points contribute to the dynamic field of feminist epistemologies and where change occurs. This article contributes to my larger project’s discussion of this concept. Broadly, feminicity argues that the active-points of feminist practices need to be understood within their situated fields as materialist informatics. In the (...)
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  • The Case for Responsibility of the IT Industry to Promote Equality for Women in Computing.Eva Turner - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):247-260.
    This paper investigates the relationship between the role that information technology (IT) has played in the development of women’s employment, the possibility of women having a significant influence on the technology’s development, and the way that the IT industry perceives women as computer scientists, users and consumers. The industry’s perception of women and men is investigated through the portrayal of them in computing advertisements. While women are increasingly updating their technological skills and know-how, and through this process are entering some (...)
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  • Ethics for Things.Alison Adam - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):149-154.
    This paper considers the ways that Information Ethics (IE) treats things. A number of critics have focused on IE’s move away from anthropocentrism to include non-humans on an equal basis in moral thinking. I enlist Actor Network Theory, Dennett’s views on ‹as if’ intentionality and Magnani’s characterization of ‹moral mediators’. Although they demonstrate different philosophical pedigrees, I argue that these three theories can be pressed into service in defence of IE’s treatment of things. Indeed the support they lend to the (...)
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  • Situated (Un-)Learning in Software Design: A Deconstructive Approach.Roswitha Hofmann & Doris Allhutter - 2010 - Poiesis and Praxis 7 (1-2):87-98.
    Constructive technology assessment aims at anticipating societal impacts of technological innovations and suggests incorporating reflexivity and social learning into technology development. Social learning involves fostering the ability of diverse social actors to cultivate sociotechnical critical skills, thus allowing technological and social change to be governed with consideration for social values and diverging interests. Based on this demand, our paper presents a discourse-theoretical, interventionist approach to software design introducing deconstruction and (un-)learning as reflective practices to guide development processes. Inspired by Donna (...)
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  • Helpless Machines and True Loving Care Givers: A Feminist Critique of Recent Trends in Human‐Robot Interaction.Jutta Weber - 2005 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 3 (4):209-218.
  • Feminist Research and Computer Science: Starting a Dialogue.Christina Björkman - 2005 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 3 (4):179-188.