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  1. The Scientific Educationist, 1870–1914.R. J. W. Selleck - 1967 - British Journal of Educational Studies 15 (2):148 - 165.
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  • The Scientific Educationist, 1870–1914.R. J. W. Selleck - 1967 - British Journal of Educational Studies 15 (2):148-165.
  • Education Without Theory.Wilfred Carr - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (2):136-159.
    This paper proceeds through four stages. First, it provides an account of the origins and evolution of the concept of educational theory. Second, it uses this historical narrative to show how what we now call 'educational theory' is deeply rooted in the foundationalist discourse of late nineteenth and early twentieth century modernity. Third, it outlines and defends a postfoundationalist critique of the foundationalist epistemological assumptions on which our understanding of educational theory has been erected. Finally, it argues that the only (...)
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  • On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By.Stein M. Wivestad - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition about conditions (...)
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  • Dewey in Britain.John Darling & John Nisbet - 2000 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):39-52.
    Dewey's ideas were slower to be accepted in Britain than elsewhere. Reasonsfor this are considered under four headings: pedagogical, epistemological,social and political. Of these, only the pedagogical ideas elicited a modicumof support in the first half of the century. Developments after 1960,however, led to widespread implementation of Dewey's principles mainly inthe primary education sector.
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