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  1. Neither Principles Nor Rules: Making Corporate Governance Work in Sub-Saharan Africa.Franklin Nakpodia, Emmanuel Adegbite, Kenneth Amaeshi & Akintola Owolabi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):391-408.
    Corporate governance is often split between rule-based and principle-based approaches to regulation in different institutional contexts. This split is often informed by the types of institutional configurations, their strengths, and the complementarities within them. This approach to corporate governance regulation is mostly discussed in the context of developed economies and their regulatory demands. However, in developing and weak market economies, such as in Sub-Saharan Africa, there is no such explicit split and the debates on such contexts in the comparative corporate (...)
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  • A Review of Internal and External Influences on Corporate Governance and Financial Accountability in Nigeria. [REVIEW]Elewechi Okike, Emmanuel Adegbite, Franklin Nakpodia & Stephen Adegbite - 2015 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 10 (2):165.
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  • Dividends Behavior in State- Versus Family-Controlled Firms: Evidence From Hong Kong. [REVIEW]Tina T. He, Wilson X. B. Li & Gordon Y. N. Tang - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):97-112.
    This study comparatively examines the dividends behavior in state-controlled firms versus family-controlled firms. With the sample of large industrial firms listed on the Main Board of Hong Kong Stock Exchange, we investigate the dividends payment rates, stability of dividends payment, the effects of firm size, profitability and growth opportunity on likelihood to pay dividends, as well as the concentration of dividend in state-controlled versus family-controlled firms. Based on the findings, we derive some ethical implications of dividends policy regarding the differences (...)
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  • Regulatory Multiplicity and Conflict: Towards a Combined Code on Corporate Governance in Nigeria.Louise Osemeke & Emmanuel Adegbite - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):431-451.
    Given the multiplicity of codes designed to regulate different stakeholders in terms of promoting good corporate governance, this paper examines areas of conflicts among the various codes and the associated implications for corporate governance practices and regulatory compliances by public-listed Nigerian firms. Using the conflict-signalling theory for developing the conceptual framework, this study examines the proliferation of codes in Nigeria, through a mixed method approach to provide an exploratory account of the implications of corporate governance regulatory multiplicity. Evidence suggests the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Challenging and Non-Enabling Institutional Contexts: Do Institutional Voids Matter?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Tazeeb Rajwani - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):135-153.
    The extant literature on comparative Corporate Social Responsibility often assumes functioning and enabling institutional arrangements, such as strong government, market and civil society, as a necessary condition for responsible business practices. Setting aside this dominant assumption and drawing insights from a case study of Fidelity Bank, Nigeria, we explore why and how firms still pursue and enact responsible business practices in what could be described as challenging and non-enabling institutional contexts for CSR. Our findings suggest that responsible business practices in (...)
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