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  1. From Mimicry to Mime by Way of Mimesis: Reflections on a General Theory of Iconicity.Göran Sonesson - 2010 - Sign Systems Studies 38 (1/4):18-65.
    Practically all theories of iconicity are denunciations of its subject matter. My own theory of iconicity was developed in order to save a particular kind of iconicity, pictoriality, from such criticism. In this interest, I distinguished pure iconicity, iconic ground, and iconic sign, on one hand, and primary and secondary iconic signs, on the other hand. Since then, however, several things have happened. The conceptual tools that I created to explain pictoriality have been shown by others to be relevant to (...)
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  • Do Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Understand Pantomimic Events?Ines Adornetti, Francesco Ferretti, Alessandra Chiera, Slawomir Wacewicz, Przemysław Żywiczyński, Valentina Deriu, Andrea Marini, Rita Magni, Laura Casula, Stefano Vicari & Giovanni Valeri - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Cultural Evolution of Structured Languages in an Open‐Ended, Continuous World.W. Carr Jon, Smith Kenny, Cornish Hannah & Kirby Simon - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):892-923.
    Language maps signals onto meanings through the use of two distinct types of structure. First, the space of meanings is discretized into categories that are shared by all users of the language. Second, the signals employed by the language are compositional: The meaning of the whole is a function of its parts and the way in which those parts are combined. In three iterated learning experiments using a vast, continuous, open-ended meaning space, we explore the conditions under which both structured (...)
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  • Human Uniqueness, Bodily Mimesis and the Evolution of Language.Jordan Zlatev - 2014 - Humana Mente 7 (27).
    I argue that an evolutionary adaptation for bodily mimesis, the volitional use of the body as a representational devise, is the “small difference” that gave rise to unique and yet pre-linguistic features of humanity such as imitation, pedagogy, intentional communication and the possibility of a cumulative, representational culture. Furthermore, it is this that made the evolution of language possible. In support for the thesis that speech evolved atop bodily mimesis and a transitional multimodal protolanguage, I review evidence for the extensive (...)
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  • Umwelt and Ape Language Experiments: On the Role of Iconicity in the Human-Ape Pidgin Language.Mirko Cerrone - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (1):41-63.
    Several language experiments have been carried out on apes and other animals aiming to narrow down the presumed qualitative gap that separates humans from other animals. These experiments, however, have been driven by the understanding of language as a purely symbolic sign system, often connected to a profound disinterest for language use in real situations and a propensity to perceive grammatical and syntactic information as the only fundamental aspects of human language. For these reasons, the language taught to apes tends (...)
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