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Hume and the Independent Witnesses

Mind 124 (496):1013-1044 (2015)

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  1. You Say You Want a Revolution: Two Notions of Probabilistic Independence.Alexander Meehan - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-33.
    Branden Fitelson and Alan Hájek have suggested that it is finally time for a “revolution” in which we jettison Kolmogorov’s axiomatization of probability, and move to an alternative like Popper’s. According to these authors, not only did Kolmogorov fail to give an adequate analysis of conditional probability, he also failed to give an adequate account of another central notion in probability theory: probabilistic independence. This paper defends Kolmogorov, with a focus on this independence charge. I show that Kolmogorov’s sophisticated theory (...)
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  • “Till at Last There Remain Nothing”: Hume’s Treatise 1.4.1 in Contemporary Perspective.David Atkinson & Jeanne Peijnenburg - 2020 - Synthese 197 (8):3305-3323.
    In A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume presents an argument according to which all knowledge reduces to probability, and all probability reduces to nothing. Many have criticized this argument, while others find nothing wrong with it. In this paper we explain that the argument is invalid as it stands, but for different reasons than have been hitherto acknowledged. Once the argument is repaired, it becomes clear that there is indeed something that reduces to nothing, but it is something other (...)
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  • A Bayesian Baseline for Belief in Uncommon Events.Vesa Palonen - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (3):159-175.
    The plausibility of uncommon events and miracles based on testimony of such an event has been much discussed. When analyzing the probabilities involved, it has mostly been assumed that the common events can be taken as data in the calculations. However, we usually have only testimonies for the common events. While this difference does not have a significant effect on the inductive part of the inference, it has a large influence on how one should view the reliability of testimonies. In (...)
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  • “Till at Last There Remain Nothing”: Hume’s Treatise 1.4.1 in Contemporary Perspective.Jeanne Peijnenburg & David Atkinson - 2020 - Synthese 197 (8):3305-3323.
    In A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume presents an argument according to which all knowledge reduces to probability, and all probability reduces to nothing. Many have criticized this argument, while others find nothing wrong with it. In this paper we explain that the argument is invalid as it stands, but for different reasons than have been hitherto acknowledged. Once the argument is repaired, it becomes clear that there is indeed something that reduces to nothing, but it is something other (...)
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  • Predicates, Parts, and Impermanence: A Contemporary Version of Some Central Buddhist Tenets.Matthew McKeever - 2018 - Religious Studies 54 (4):475-488.
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  • Miracles.Michael Levine - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Miracles.Timothy McGrew - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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