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The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics

North Point Press (1984)

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  1. Old Joshu Lives On.James H. Austin - 2017 - Contemporary Buddhism 18 (1):72-88.
    Joshu was a Chan master back in Tang Dynasty China. Some of his dialogues became koans that are still widely used by contemporary Zen aspirants. Indian Buddhists originally employed the word ‘doubt’ in a way that developed new shades of meaning, both as Joshu played with the word, and as this term evolved further in the koan traditions of Sino-Japanese Buddhism. Joshu lived for 120 years. This extraordinary lifespan is far beyond that of today’s so-called ‘SuperAgers’. Recent research based on (...)
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  • Buddhism, Abortion and the Middle Way.Roy W. Perrett - 2000 - Asian Philosophy 10 (2):101 – 114.
    What have modern Buddhist ethicists to say about abortion and is there anything to be learned from it? A number of writers have suggested that Buddhism (particularly Japanese Buddhism) does indeed have something important to offer here: a response to the dilemma of abortion that is a 'middle way' between the pro-choice and pro-life extremes that have polarised the western debate. I discuss what this suggestion might amount to and present a defence of its plausibility.
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  • Toward a Description of Dogen's Moral Virtues.Douglas K. Mikkelson - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):225-251.
    Revitalized interest in "the virtues" has affected the study of Buddhism in recent years, and in this regard we may benefit by focusing on the Zen Master Dōgen (1200-1253). Seeking to describe Dōgen's moral virtues, we might begin by a study of his primer, the "Shōbōgenzō" Zuimonki; a particularly efficacious template for this project would appear to be one provided by Edmund L. Pincoffs in his book "Quandaries and Virtues: Against Reductivism in Ethics". This "modus operandi" reveals Dōgen's exhortation of (...)
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  • For the Sake of a Stone? Inanimate Things and the Demands of Morality.Simon P. James - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (4):384-397.
    Abstract Everyday inanimate things such as stones, teapots and bicycles are not objects to which moral agents could have direct duties; they do not have moral status. It is usually assumed that there is therefore no reason to think that a morally good person would, on account of her goodness, be disposed to treat them well for their own sakes. I challenge this assumption. I begin by showing that to act for the sake of an entity need not be to (...)
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