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  1. The Rules Versus Similarity Distinction.Emmanuel M. Pothos - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):1-14.
    The distinction between rules and similarity is central to our understanding of much of cognitive psychology. Two aspects of existing research have motivated the present work. First, in different cognitive psychology areas we typically see different conceptions of rules and similarity; for example, rules in language appear to be of a different kind compared to rules in categorization. Second, rules processes are typically modeled as separate from similarity ones; for example, in a learning experiment, rules and similarity influences would be (...)
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  • Probabilistic Models of Language Processing and Acquisition.Nick Chater & Christopher D. Manning - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (7):335-344.
  • Quasiregularity and Its Discontents: The Legacy of the Past Tense Debate.Mark S. Seidenberg & David C. Plaut - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1190-1228.
    Rumelhart and McClelland's chapter about learning the past tense created a degree of controversy extraordinary even in the adversarial culture of modern science. It also stimulated a vast amount of research that advanced the understanding of the past tense, inflectional morphology in English and other languages, the nature of linguistic representations, relations between language and other phenomena such as reading and object recognition, the properties of artificial neural networks, and other topics. We examine the impact of the Rumelhart and McClelland (...)
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  • Parallel Distributed Processing at 25: Further Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1024-1077.
    This paper introduces a special issue of Cognitive Science initiated on the 25th anniversary of the publication of Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP), a two-volume work that introduced the use of neural network models as vehicles for understanding cognition. The collection surveys the core commitments of the PDP framework, the key issues the framework has addressed, and the debates the framework has spawned, and presents viewpoints on the current status of these issues. The articles focus on both historical roots and contemporary (...)
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  • Learning Phonology With Substantive Bias: An Experimental and Computational Study of Velar Palatalization.Colin Wilson - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (5):945-982.
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  • Dissociations in Performance on Novel Versus Irregular Items: Single‐Route Demonstrations With Input Gain in Localist and Distributed Models.Christopher T. Kello, Daragh E. Sibley & David C. Plaut - 2005 - Cognitive Science 29 (4):627-654.
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  • Linguistic Self‐Correction in the Absence of Feedback: A New Approach to the Logical Problem of Language Acquisition.Michael Ramscar & Daniel Yarlett - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (6):927-960.
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  • Morphology and Memory: Toward an Integrated Theory.Ray Jackendoff & Jenny Audring - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
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  • Perceptual Constraints and the Learnability of Simple Grammars.Ansgar D. Endress, Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz & Jacques Mehler - 2007 - Cognition 105 (3):577-614.
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  • Two Types of Thought: Evidence From Aphasia.Jules Davidoff - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):20-21.
    Evidence from aphasia is considered that leads to a distinction between abstract and concrete thought processes and hence for a distinction between rules and similarity. It is argued that perceptual classification is inherently a rule-following procedure and these rules are unable to be followed when a patient has difficulty with name comprehension and retrieval.
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  • Keeping It Simple: Studying Grammatical Encoding with Lexically Reduced Item Sets.Alma Veenstra, Daniel J. Acheson & Antje S. Meyer - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Children Use Verb Semantics to Retreat From Overgeneralization Errors: A Novel Verb Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2).
  • Developing Biases.Ruben van de Vijver & Dinah Baer-Henney - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Linguistic Constraints on Statistical Word Segmentation: The Role of Consonants in Arabic and English.Itamar Kastner & Frans Adriaans - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):494-518.
    Statistical learning is often taken to lie at the heart of many cognitive tasks, including the acquisition of language. One particular task in which probabilistic models have achieved considerable success is the segmentation of speech into words. However, these models have mostly been tested against English data, and as a result little is known about how a statistical learning mechanism copes with input regularities that arise from the structural properties of different languages. This study focuses on statistical word segmentation in (...)
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  • Three Ideal Observer Models for Rule Learning in Simple Languages.Michael C. Frank & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):360-371.
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  • Learning General Phonological Rules From Distributional Information: A Computational Model.Shira Calamaro & Gaja Jarosz - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (3):647-666.
    Phonological rules create alternations in the phonetic realizations of related words. These rules must be learned by infants in order to identify the phonological inventory, the morphological structure, and the lexicon of a language. Recent work proposes a computational model for the learning of one kind of phonological alternation, allophony . This paper extends the model to account for learning of a broader set of phonological alternations and the formalization of these alternations as general rules. In Experiment 1, we apply (...)
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  • Birth of an Abstraction: A Dynamical Systems Account of the Discovery of an Elsewhere Principle in a Category Learning Task.Whitney Tabor, Pyeong W. Cho & Harry Dankowicz - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (7):1193-1227.
    Human participants and recurrent (“connectionist”) neural networks were both trained on a categorization system abstractly similar to natural language systems involving irregular (“strong”) classes and a default class. Both the humans and the networks exhibited staged learning and a generalization pattern reminiscent of the Elsewhere Condition (Kiparsky, 1973). Previous connectionist accounts of related phenomena have often been vague about the nature of the networks’ encoding systems. We analyzed our network using dynamical systems theory, revealing topological and geometric properties that can (...)
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  • Learning Diphone-Based Segmentation.Robert Daland & Janet B. Pierrehumbert - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (1):119-155.
    This paper reconsiders the diphone-based word segmentation model of Cairns, Shillcock, Chater, and Levy (1997) and Hockema (2006), previously thought to be unlearnable. A statistically principled learning model is developed using Bayes’ theorem and reasonable assumptions about infants’ implicit knowledge. The ability to recover phrase-medial word boundaries is tested using phonetic corpora derived from spontaneous interactions with children and adults. The (unsupervised and semi-supervised) learning models are shown to exhibit several crucial properties. First, only a small amount of language exposure (...)
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  • The Interaction of Language‐Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions.Dinah Baer‐Henney, Frank Kügler & Ruben Vijver - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1537-1569.
    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance, and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines backness (...)
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  • Past Tense Route Priming.Emily R. Cohen-Shikora & David A. Balota - 2013 - Cognition 126 (3):397-404.
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  • Children's Acquisition of the English Past‐Tense: Evidence for a Single‐Route Account From Novel Verb Production Data.Ryan P. Blything, Ben Ambridge & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):621-639.
    This study adjudicates between two opposing accounts of morphological productivity, using English past-tense as its test case. The single-route model posits that both regular and irregular past-tense forms are generated by analogy across stored exemplars in associative memory. In contrast, the dual-route model posits that regular inflection requires use of a formal “add -ed” rule that does not require analogy across regular past-tense forms. Children saw animations of an animal performing a novel action described with a novel verb. Past-tense forms (...)
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  • The English Past Tense: Analogy Redux.Steve Chandler - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (3).
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  • Using Schema Theory to Support a Whole-Word Approach to Phonological Acquisition.Sara Sowers-Wills - 2017 - Cognitive Linguistics 28 (1):155-191.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  • An Elicited‐Production Study of Inflectional Verb Morphology in Child Finnish.Sanna H. M. Räsänen, Ben Ambridge & Julian M. Pine - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1704-1738.
    Many generativist accounts argue for very early knowledge of inflection on the basis of very low rates of person/number marking errors in young children's speech. However, studies of Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese have revealed that these low overall error rates actually hide important differences across the verb paradigm. The present study investigated children's production of person/number marked verbs by eliciting present tense verb forms from 82 native Finnish-speaking children aged 2;2–4;8 years. Four main findings were observed: Rates of person/number marking (...)
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  • Rules Versus Statistics: Insights From a Highly Inflected Language.Jelena Mirković, Mark S. Seidenberg & Marc F. Joanisse - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (4):638-681.
    Inflectional morphology has been taken as a paradigmatic example of rule-governed grammatical knowledge (Pinker, 1999). The plausibility of this claim may be related to the fact that it is mainly based on studies of English, which has a very simple inflectional system. We examined the representation of inflectional morphology in Serbian, which encodes number, gender, and case for nouns. Linguists standardly characterize this system as a complex set of rules, with disagreements about their exact form. We present analyses of a (...)
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