Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. ‘F = MA’and the Newtonian Revolution: An Exit From Religion Through Religion.Loup Verlet - 1996 - History of Science 34 (3):303-346.
  • Scientific Structuralism: Structuralism(s) About Science: Some Common Problems.Bas C. van Fraassen - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):45–61.
  • Absolute Time: The Limit of Kant's Idealism.Marius Stan - 2019 - Noûs 53 (2):433-461.
    I examine here if Kant can explain our knowledge of duration by showing that time has metric structure. To do so, I spell out two possible solutions: time’s metric could be intrinsic or extrinsic. I argue that Kant’s resources are too weak to secure an intrinsic, transcendentally-based temporal metrics; but he can supply an extrinsic metric, based in a metaphysical fact about matter. I conclude that Transcendental Idealism is incomplete: it cannot account for the durative aspects of experience—or it can (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Kant Meets Cyberpunk.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (55).
    I defend a how-possibly argument for Kantian transcendental idealism, drawing on concepts from David Chalmers, Nick Bostrom, and the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction. If we are artificial intelligences living in a virtual reality instantiated on a giant computer, then the fundamental structure of reality might be very different than we suppose. Indeed, since computation does not require spatial properties, spatiality might not be a feature of things as they are in themselves but instead only the way that things necessarily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Rethinking Newton’s Principia.Simon Saunders - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (1):22-48.
    It is widely accepted that the notion of an inertial frame is central to Newtonian mechanics and that the correct space-time structure underlying Newton’s methods in Principia is neo-Newtonian or Galilean space-time. I argue to the contrary that inertial frames are not needed in Newton’s theory of motion, and that the right space-time structure for Newton’s Principia requires the notion of parallelism of spatial directions at different times and nothing more. Only relative motions are definable in this framework, never absolute (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • The Scientific Intelligibility of Absolute Space: A Study of Newtonian Argument.Hugh M. Lacey - 1970 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (4):317-342.
  • Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence, Brain in a Vat, Five-Minute Hypothesis, McTaggart’s Paradox, Etc. Are Clarified in Quantum Language [Revised Version].Shiro Ishikawa - 2018 - Open Journal of Philosophy 8 (5):466-480.
    Recently we proposed "quantum language" (or, the linguistic Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics"), which was not only characterized as the metaphysical and linguistic turn of quantum mechanics but also the linguistic turn of Descartes=Kant epistemology. We believe that quantum language is the language to describe science, which is the final goal of dualistic idealism. Hence there is a reason to want to clarify, from the quantum linguistic point of view, the following problems: "brain in a vat argument", "the Cogito proposition", (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Fragmentation of Renaissance Occultism and the Decline of Magic.John Henry - 2008 - History of Science 46 (1):1-48.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Relationism and Relativity.Michael R. Gardner - 1977 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (3):215-233.
  • Remarks on Relational Theories of Motion.John Earman - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):83 - 87.
    In a recent article in this journal, Barbara Lariviere offers a very useful distinction between two ways of understanding the claims that Leibniz, or relational theorists in general, might wish to make about the nature of motion and the structure of space and time; viz., There is no real inertial structure to space-time.and There is a real inertial structure to space-time, but it is dynamical rather than absolute.Citing the authority of Weyl, the author argues that L1 is untenable; indeed, the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The History of SPACE Between Science and Ordinary Language: What Can Words Tell Us About Conceptual Change?Lin Chalozin-Dovrat - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (2):244-277.
    A generous postdoctoral grant from the Cohn Institute for History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas at Tel Aviv University enabled this research. I conducted the very earliest stage of the work while holding a postdoctoral position at the Minerva Humanities Center and the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at TAU, which I would also like very much to thank. Participants in the workshop of the School of Philosophy, Linguistics and Science Studies in TAU under the direction of Professor (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aquinas on Inner Space.F. F. Centore - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):351 - 363.
    Can one deny the intelligibility of “extramental nonbeing” in pure ontology while affirming its intelligibility in physics? When one sweeps the heavens clean of matter does one also necessarily affirm the existence of absolute nonbeing in those “clean” spaces? Does talking about space necessarily mean talking about nonbeing? How could there possibly be “space” which is not absolute nothingness? How, if at all, can statements about space be reconciled with such self-contradictory statements as “What is not, is“?The purpose of this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hume on Causal Contiguity and Causal Succession.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (2):271-282.
    Hume notoriously maintains that contiguity, succession, and constant conjunction are individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions of causation. While his arguments for the necessity of constant conjunction have been thoroughly dissected, his arguments for contiguity and succession have generally been either ignored or misstated. I hope both to correct this unfortunate state of affairs and to show some fatal defects in Hume's account.The pertinent passages in Hume's writings acknowledge three conceivable ways in which the temporal relation between causes and effects (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Recovery of Geometrodynamics From Two Different Sets of First Principles.Edward Anderson - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (1):15-57.
  • Newton and Leibniz on Non-Substantival Space.Alejandro Cassini - 2005 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 20 (1):25-43.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze Leibniz and Newton’s conception of space, and to point out where their agreements and disagreements lie with respect to its mode of existence. I shall offer a definite characterization of Leibniz and Newton’s conceptions of space. I will show that, according to their own concepts of substance, both Newtonian and Leibnizian spaces are not substantiva!. The reason of that consists in the fact that space is not capable of action. Moreover, there is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Symmetry & Possibility: To Reduce or Not Reduce?Dean Rickles - unknown
    In this paper I examine the connection between symmetry and modality from the perspective of `reduction' methods in geometric mechanics. I begin by setting the problem up as a choice between two opposing views: reduction and non-reduction. I then discern four views on the matter in the literature; they are distinguished by their advocation of distinct geometric spaces as representing `reality'. I come down in favour of non-reductive methods.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • 'No Success Like Failure ...': Einstein's Quest for General Relativity, 1907-1920.Michel Janssen - unknown
    This is the chapter on general relativity for the Cambridge Companion to Einstein which I am co-editing with Christoph Lehner.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Indiscernibles, General Covariance, and Other Symmetries.Simon Saunders - 2001 - In Abhay Ashtekar, Jürgen Renn, Don Howard, Abner Shimony & S. Sarkar (eds.), Revisiting the Foundations of Relativistic Physics. Festschrift in Honour of John Stachel. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    What is the meaning of general covariance? We learn something about it from the hole argument, due originally to Einstein. In his search for a theory of gravity, he noted that if the equations of motion are covariant under arbitrary coordinate transformations, then particle coordinates at a given time can be varied arbitrarily - they are underdetermined - even if their values at all earlier times are held fixed. It is the same for the values of fields. The argument can (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • The Mathematical Representation of the Arrow of Time.Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker - 2012 - Iyyun 61:167-192.
    This paper distinguishes between 3 meanings of reversal, all of which are mathematically equivalent in classical mechanics: velocity reversal, retrodiction, and time reversal. It then concludes that in order to have well defined velocities a primitive arrow of time must be included in every time slice. The paper briefly mentions that this arrow cannot come from the Second Law of thermodynamics, but this point is developed in more details elsewhere.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation