Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Loneliness and Appearance: Toward a Concept of Ontological Agency.Sarah Drews Lucas - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):709-722.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Gender, Subjectivities and Experiences: Facing the Past and Feminist Politics of Solidarity.Deana Jovanovic - 2011 - Filozofija I Društvo 22 (1):219-243.
    The main question the article discusses is how and why feminism can reflect upon multiple differences in Serbia through the idea of solidarity in the discourse of facing the past. The article pays attention to the connection between feminist practices and theories, solidarity, and the idea about moral responsibility. The article opens discussion about solidarity seen as a strategic notion and points out to the politics of exclusion/inclusion of multiple Others. Attention is devoted to gender categories and construction of differences, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Solidarity in Dark Times: Arendt and Gadamer on the Politics of Appearance.Jennifer Gaffney - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (12):e12554.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Die Etiek van Sending as Anti-Kyriargale Bemagtiging En Liefdesdiens: ‘N Fokus Op 1 Tessalonisense En Mag of Bemagtiging.Jacobus Kok - 2012 - Hts Theological Studies 68 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Feminism as Revolutionary Practice: From Justice and the Politics of Recognition to Freedom.Marieke Borren - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):197-214.
    In the 1980s extra-parliamentary social movements and critical theories of race, class, and gender added a new sociocultural understanding of justice—recognition—to the much older socioeconomic one. The best-known form of the struggle for recognition is the identity politics of disadvantaged groups. I argue that there is still another option to conceptualize their predicament, neglected in recent political philosophy, which understands exclusion not in terms of injustice, more particularly a lack of sociocultural recognition, but in terms of a lack of freedom. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations