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  1. The Role of Emotion Modulation in Moral Bioenhancement Debate.Karolina Kudlek - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):113-123.
    This paper aims to analyze technical and internal aspects of one particular type of human moral enhancement, i.e. enhancement of moral motivation via direct emotion modulation. More precisely, it challenges the assumption that modifying certain emotions will have the results desired by the advocates of this theory. It is argued that neuropsychological understanding of the role and function of emotions, as well as of underlying cognitive mechanisms, might be relevant for the discussion about biomedical enhancement of moral capacities. Moreover, typical (...)
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  • Visually Activating Pathogen Disgust: A New Instrument for Studying the Behavioral Immune System.Paxton D. Culpepper, Jan Havlíček, Juan David Leongómez & S. Craig Roberts - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Influence of the Evolutionary Past on the Mind: An Analysis of the Preference for Landscapes in the Human Species.Joelson M. B. Moura, Washington S. Ferreira Júnior, Taline C. Silva & Ulysses P. Albuquerque - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • From Specificity to Sensitivity: Affective States Modulate Visual Working Memory for Emotional Expressive Faces.Thomas Maran, Pierre Sachse & Marco Furtner - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Sex Differences in Disgust: Why Are Women More Easily Disgusted Than Men?Laith Al-Shawaf, David M. G. Lewis & David M. Buss - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (2):149-160.
    Women have consistently higher levels of disgust than men. This sex difference is substantial in magnitude, highly replicable, emerges with diverse assessment methods, and affects a wide array of outcomes—including job selection, mate choice, food aversions, and psychological disorders. Despite the importance of this far-reaching sex difference, sound theoretical explanations have lagged behind the empirical discoveries. In this article, we focus on the evolutionary-functional level of analysis, outlining hypotheses capable of explaining why women have higher levels of disgust than men. (...)
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