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  1. Neither Principles Nor Rules: Making Corporate Governance Work in Sub-Saharan Africa.Franklin Nakpodia, Emmanuel Adegbite, Kenneth Amaeshi & Akintola Owolabi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):391-408.
    Corporate governance is often split between rule-based and principle-based approaches to regulation in different institutional contexts. This split is often informed by the types of institutional configurations, their strengths, and the complementarities within them. This approach to corporate governance regulation is mostly discussed in the context of developed economies and their regulatory demands. However, in developing and weak market economies, such as in Sub-Saharan Africa, there is no such explicit split and the debates on such contexts in the comparative corporate (...)
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  • A Review of Internal and External Influences on Corporate Governance and Financial Accountability in Nigeria. [REVIEW]Elewechi Okike, Emmanuel Adegbite, Franklin Nakpodia & Stephen Adegbite - 2015 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 10 (2):165.
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  • The Politics of Shareholder Activism in Nigeria.Emmanuel Adegbite, Kenneth Amaeshi & Olufemi Amao - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):389-402.
    Shareholder activism has become a force for good in the extant corporate governance literature. In this article, we present a case study of Nigeria to show how shareholder activism, as a corporate governance mechanism, can constitute a space for unhealthy politics and turbulent politicking, which is a reflection of the country’s brand of politics. As a result, we point out some translational challenges, and suggest more caution, in the diffusion of corporate governance practices across different institutional environments. We contribute to (...)
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  • Multinational Corporate Power, Influence and Responsibility in Global Supply Chains.Stephen Chen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):365-374.
    This paper examines the question of how to determine the extent of a multinational corporation ’s corporate social responsibility for actions by its suppliers. Drawing on three theories of power and influence from the organization and management literature—resource-dependence theory, social exchange theory and social network theory, this paper presents a conceptual framework for analysing the extent of power and influence of an MNC in a global supply chain based on a consideration of economic and non-economic exchanges and direct and indirect (...)
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  • Staking Cosmopolitan Claims: How Firms and NGOs Talk About Supply Chain Responsibility.Dirk C. Moosmayer & Susannah M. Davis - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (3):403-417.
    Non-governmental organizations increasingly hold firms responsible for harm caused in their supply chains. In this paper, we explore how firms and NGOs talk about cosmopolitan claims regarding supply chain responsibility. We investigate the language used by Apple and a group of Chinese NGOs as well as Adidas and the international NGO Greenpeace about the firms’ environmental responsibilities in their supply chains. We apply electronic text analytic methods to firm and NGO reports totaling over 155,000 words. We identify different conceptualizations of (...)
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  • Ethical Sourcing: An Analysis of the Literature and Implications for Future Research.Seongtae Kim, Claudia Colicchia & David Menachof - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):1033-1052.
    The purpose of this study is to present a rigorous, focused review on how this field of ethical sourcing research has grown and evolved over the decades, providing implications for future research. We combine two research methodologies in this study: a systematic literature review and a citation network analysis. The former is used as a scientific tool to select the most relevant ethical sourcing articles, while the latter is then applied as a research technique to analyse these selected articles. Such (...)
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  • Dominant Articulations in Academic Business and Society Discourse on NGO–Business Relations: A Critical Assessment. [REVIEW]Salla Laasonen, Martin Fougère & Arno Kourula - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):521-545.
    Relations between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and companies have been the subject of a sharply increasing amount of publications in recent years within academic business journals. In this article, we critically assess this fast-developing body of literature, which we treat as forming a ‘business and society discourse’ on NGO–business relations. Drawing on discourse theory, we examine 199 academic articles in 11 business and society, international business, and management journals. Focusing on the dominant articulations on the NGO–business relationship and key signifiers they (...)
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  • Regulatory Multiplicity and Conflict: Towards a Combined Code on Corporate Governance in Nigeria.Louise Osemeke & Emmanuel Adegbite - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):431-451.
    Given the multiplicity of codes designed to regulate different stakeholders in terms of promoting good corporate governance, this paper examines areas of conflicts among the various codes and the associated implications for corporate governance practices and regulatory compliances by public-listed Nigerian firms. Using the conflict-signalling theory for developing the conceptual framework, this study examines the proliferation of codes in Nigeria, through a mixed method approach to provide an exploratory account of the implications of corporate governance regulatory multiplicity. Evidence suggests the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Its Economic Impact and Link to the Bullwhip Effect.Nader Asgary & Gang Li - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):665-681.
    This paper examines the economic impact of implementing Corporate Social Responsibility in the supply chain operations of multinational corporations. Because they have global supply chains in emerging markets, MNCs face certain operational challenges. For example, unethical operations often result in a huge loss to MNCs in the long run, even though their initial cost seems to be low. In this paper, we extend the Bullwhip Effect theory in supply chain management to the ethical operations context, and define and evaluate a (...)
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  • Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
    Poor working conditions remain a serious problem in supplier facilities in developing countries. While previous research has explored this from the developed buyers’ side, we examine this phenomenon from the perspective of developing countries’ suppliers and subcontractors. Utilizing qualitative data from a major knitwear exporting cluster in India and a stakeholder management lens, we develop a framework that shows how the assumptions of conventional, buyer-driven voluntary governance break down in the dilution of buyer power and in the web of factors (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Challenging and Non-Enabling Institutional Contexts: Do Institutional Voids Matter?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Tazeeb Rajwani - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):135-153.
    The extant literature on comparative Corporate Social Responsibility often assumes functioning and enabling institutional arrangements, such as strong government, market and civil society, as a necessary condition for responsible business practices. Setting aside this dominant assumption and drawing insights from a case study of Fidelity Bank, Nigeria, we explore why and how firms still pursue and enact responsible business practices in what could be described as challenging and non-enabling institutional contexts for CSR. Our findings suggest that responsible business practices in (...)
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  • Management of Social Issues in Supply Chains: A Literature Review Exploring Social Issues, Actions and Performance Outcomes.Sadaat Ali Yawar & Stefan Seuring - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):621-643.
    The social dimension of sustainable development and its impact on supply chains have so far received less attention than the environmental dimension. The aim of the research is to explore the intersection between social issues, corporate social responsibility actions and performance outcomes. A structured literature review of social issues in supply chains is presented, analysing the research published so far in peer-reviewed publications. Linking CSR and supply chain management allows the exploration of strategies and performance outcomes with a focus on (...)
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  • Conflict Minerals and Supply Chain Due Diligence: An Exploratory Study of Multi-Tier Supply Chains.Hannes Hofmann, Martin C. Schleper & Constantin Blome - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):115-141.
    As recently stakeholders complain about the use of conflict minerals in consumer products that are often invisible to them in final products, firms across industries implement conflict mineral management practices. Conflict minerals are those, whose systemic exploitation and trade contribute to human right violations in the country of extraction and surrounding areas. Particularly, supply chain managers in the Western world are challenged taking reasonable steps to identify and prevent risks associated with these resources due to the globally dispersed nature of (...)
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