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  1. Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences.Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot-Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while the (...)
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  • What Exactly is Universal Grammar, and has Anyone Seen It?Ewa Dąbrowska - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Lexical Distributional Cues, but Not Situational Cues, Are Readily Used to Learn Abstract Locative Verb-Structure Associations.Katherine E. Twomey, Franklin Chang & Ben Ambridge - 2016 - Cognition 153:124-139.
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  • Semantics Versus Statistics in the Retreat From Locative Overgeneralization Errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2012 - Cognition 123 (2):260-279.
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  • How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
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  • Psych Verbs, the Linking Problem, and the Acquisition of Language.Joshua K. Hartshorne, Timothy J. O’Donnell, Yasutada Sudo, Miki Uruwashi, Miseon Lee & Jesse Snedeker - 2016 - Cognition 157:268-288.
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  • Children Use Verb Semantics to Retreat From Overgeneralization Errors: A Novel Verb Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2).
  • Corpus Evidence of the Viability of Statistical Preemption.Adele E. Goldberg - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (1).
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