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  1. What Exactly is Universal Grammar, and has Anyone Seen It?Ewa Dąbrowska - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Lexical Distributional Cues, but Not Situational Cues, Are Readily Used to Learn Abstract Locative Verb-Structure Associations.Katherine E. Twomey, Franklin Chang & Ben Ambridge - 2016 - Cognition 153:124-139.
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  • Semantics Versus Statistics in the Retreat From Locative Overgeneralization Errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2012 - Cognition 123 (2):260-279.
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  • How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
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  • Psych Verbs, the Linking Problem, and the Acquisition of Language.Joshua K. Hartshorne, Timothy J. O’Donnell, Yasutada Sudo, Miki Uruwashi, Miseon Lee & Jesse Snedeker - 2016 - Cognition 157:268-288.
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  • When Absence of Evidence Is Evidence of Absence: Rational Inferences From Absent Data.Anne S. Hsu, Andy Horng, Thomas L. Griffiths & Nick Chater - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1155-1167.
    Identifying patterns in the world requires noticing not only unusual occurrences, but also unusual absences. We examined how people learn from absences, manipulating the extent to which an absence is expected. People can make two types of inferences from the absence of an event: either the event is possible but has not yet occurred, or the event never occurs. A rational analysis using Bayesian inference predicts that inferences from absent data should depend on how much the absence is expected to (...)
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