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  1. Multinational Enterprise Strategies for Addressing Sustainability: The Need for Consolidation.Roger Leonard Burritt, Katherine Leanne Christ, Hussain Gulzar Rammal & Stefan Schaltegger - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (2):389-410.
    This paper examines the growing number of publications on multinational enterprise management of sustainability issues. Based on an integrative literature review and thematic analysis, the paper analyses and synthesises the current state of knowledge about main issues arising. Key issues identified include the following: choice of sustainability strategies; management of the views of headquarters towards sustainability; local cultural sustainability perspectives in developed and developing host countries; MNEs with home in developing/emerging countries; and resource availability for implementing sustainability initiatives. Findings indicate (...)
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  • Moral Problems of Employing Foreign Workers.Aviva Geva - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (3):381-403.
    The employment of foreign workers is one of the most crucial problems today in the domain of work relations. Absorbing workersfrom abroad poses serious questions concerning the moral obligations of the employers as well as the government authorities in the migrantreceiving country. Unfortunately, the moral dilemmas of foreign labor have been largely neglected by business ethics researchers. This paper develops a conceptual framework based on the multinational corporation (MNC) ethical research to help examine the moral obligations of employers and states (...)
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  • Transnational Corporate Social Repsonsibility.Marne L. Arthaud-Day - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (1):1-22.
    Comparatively few studies have analyzed the social behavior of multinational corporations (MNCs) at a cross-national level. To address this gap in the literature, we propose a “transnational” model of corporate social responsibility (CSR) that permits identification of universal domains, yet incorporates the flexibility and adaptability demanded by international research. The model is tri-dimensional in that it juxtaposes: 1) Bartlett and Ghoshal’s (1998, 2000) typology of MNC strategies (multinational, global, “international,” and transnational); 2) the three conceptual domains of CSR (human rights, (...)
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  • Strategic Direction of Corporate Community Involvement.Gordon Liu, Teck-Yong Eng & Wai-Wai Ko - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):469-487.
    Previous research on corporate community involvement (CCI) initiatives indicates that such behaviour is critical for building neighbourhood relationships and extending corporate influence in the community, but there is little theoretical work that provides a clear picture of managing the nature of the initiatives from different stakeholder management approaches. Drawing from theoretical insights of stakeholder theory and the concept of social capital, this article proposes nine strategic directions for CCI initiatives, and concludes by discussing the management implications of the proposed strategic (...)
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  • Weaning Business Ethics From Strategic Economism: The Development Ethics Perspective. [REVIEW]Prabhir Vishnu Poruthiyil - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):735-749.
    For more than three decades, business ethics has suggested and evaluated strategies for multinationals to address abject deprivations and weak regulatory institutions in developing countries. Critical appraisals, internal and external, have observed these concerns being severely constrained by the overwhelming prioritization of economic values, i.e., economism. Recent contributions to business ethics stress a re-imagination of the field wherein economic goals are downgraded and more attention given to redistribution of wealth and well-being of the weaker individuals and groups. Development ethics, a (...)
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  • Multinational Enterprise Subsidiaries and Their CSR: A Conceptual Framework of the Management of CSR in Smaller Emerging Economies.Kristin Hah & Susan Freeman - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):1-12.
    There is a lack of theoretical consensus on how multinational enterprises (MNEs) should implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) to build legitimacy, particularly those operating in the smaller Asian emerging market context, where current growth in the global economy is being felt more acutely than elsewhere. This paper argues for theoretical integration of business ethics (BE) and international business (IB) research to address this concern. Hence, we explore the management of CSR strategies by MNE subsidiaries with specific interest on their proactive (...)
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  • Corporate Sustainability Reporting: A Study in Disingenuity? [REVIEW]Güler Aras & David Crowther - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):279 - 288.
    Over recent years, there has been a focus in corporate activity upon the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and one of its central platforms, the notion of sustainability, and particularly sustainable development. We argue in this article that the use of such a term has the effect of obfuscating the real situation regarding the effect of corporate activity upon the external environment and the consequent implications for the future. One of the effects of persuading that corporate activity is sustainable (...)
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  • Configuration of External Influences: The Combined Effects of Institutions and Stakeholders on Corporate Social Responsibility Strategies. [REVIEW]Min-Dong Paul Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):281-298.
    This article introduces a theoretical framework that combines institutional and stakeholder theories to explain how firms choose their corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy. Organizational researchers have identified several distinct CSR strategies (e.g., obstructionist, defensive, accommodative, and proactive), but did not explain the sources of divergence. This article argues that the divergence comes from the variability in the configuration of external influences that consists of institutional and stakeholder pressures. While institutions affect firms’ social behavior by shaping the macro-level incentive structure and (...)
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  • The Emergence of Corporate Social Responsibility in Chile: The Importance of Authenticity and Social Networks.Terry Beckman, Alison Colwell & Peggy H. Cunningham - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):191 - 206.
    Little is known about how and why corporate social responsibility (CSR) emerged in lesser developed countries. In order to address this knowledge gap, we used Chile as a test case and conducted a series of in-depth interviews with leaders of CSR initiatives. We also did an Internet and literature search to help provide support for the findings that emerged from our data. We discovered that while there are similarities in the drivers of CSR in developed countries, there are distinct differences (...)
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  • Institutional Structure and Firm Social Performance in Transitional Economies: Evidence of Multinational Corporations in China.Justin Tan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):171 - 189.
    With the expansion of multinational corporations (MNCs), the alarming upsurge in widely publicized and notable corporate scandals involving MNCs in emerging markets has begun to draw both academic and managerial attention to look beyond home market practices to the pressing concern of CSR in emerging markets. Previous studies on CSR have focused primarily on Western markets, reserving limited discussions in addressing the issue of MNC attitudes and CSR practices in their emerging host markets abroad. Despite this incongruity in academic response (...)
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  • The Contribution of Environmental and Social Standards Towards Ensuring Legitimacy in Supply Chain Governance.Martin Mueller, Virginia Gomes dos Santos & Stefan Seuring - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):509-523.
    Increasingly, companies implement social and environmental standards as instruments towards corporate social responsibility in supply chains. This is based on the assumption that such standards increase legitimacy among stakeholders. Yet, a wide variety of standards with different requirement levels exist and companies might tend to introduce the ones with low exigencies, using them as a legitimacy front. This strategy jeopardizes the reputation of social and environmental standards among stakeholders and their long-term trust in these instruments of CSR, meaning that all (...)
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  • Giving as Good as They Get? Organization and Employee Expectations of Ethical Business Practice.John Simmons Chris Mason - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (1):47-70.
    Corporate malpractice and malfeasance on an unprecedented scale have brought ethical issues to the fore and accentuated demands from activists, governments, and the public for greater corporate social responsibility . The predominant response of researchers and policymakers has been to focus on the external impact of business operations and the merits of regulation or persuasion in achieving more responsible practice in these areas. In this article, we focus on a less well explored aspect of CSR, namely the evaluation of an (...)
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  • Multinational Corporate Power, Influence and Responsibility in Global Supply Chains.Stephen Chen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):365-374.
    This paper examines the question of how to determine the extent of a multinational corporation ’s corporate social responsibility for actions by its suppliers. Drawing on three theories of power and influence from the organization and management literature—resource-dependence theory, social exchange theory and social network theory, this paper presents a conceptual framework for analysing the extent of power and influence of an MNC in a global supply chain based on a consideration of economic and non-economic exchanges and direct and indirect (...)
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  • Giving as Good as They Get? Organization and Employee Expectations of Ethical Business Practice.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (1):47-70.
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  • The Assessment of the Stakeholders' Environment in the New Age of Knowledge: An Empirical Study of the Influence of the Organisational Structure.Maria de la Cruz Deniz-Deniz & Celia Zarraga-Oberty - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (4):372-388.
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  • Cultural Values, Utilitarian Orientation, and Ethical Decision Making: A Comparison of U.S. And Puerto Rican Professionals.Lillian Y. Fok, Dinah M. Payne & Christy M. Corey - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (2):263-279.
    Using samples from the U.S. and Puerto Rico, we examine cross-cultural differences in cultural value dimensions, and relate these to act and rule utilitarian orientations, and ethical decision making of business professionals. Although these places share the same legal environment, culturally they are distinct. In addition to tests of between-group differences, a model in which utilitarian orientation mediates the influence of cultural values on ethical decisions was evaluated at the individual level of analysis. Results indicated national culture differences on three (...)
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  • The CSR of MNC Subsidiaries in Developing Countries: Global, Local, Substantive or Diluted? [REVIEW]D. Jamali - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (S2):181 - 200.
    With the advent of globalization, the track record of multinational corporations (MNCs) has been mixed at best in relation to their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) involvement in developing countries. This article attempts to cross-fertilize insights from the business-society and international business political behavior literature streams to identify relevant dimensions and contingencies that can be used to analyze the CSR of MNCs in developing countries and the extent of standardization or localization of their strategies. The article makes use of the new (...)
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  • The Assessment of the Stakeholders' Environment in the New Age of Knowledge: An Empirical Study of the Influence of the Organisational Structure.Maria de la Cruz Deniz-Deniz & Celia Zarraga-Oberty - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (4):372-388.
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