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  1. On the Relationship Between Persistent Delay Activity, Repetition Enhancement and Priming.Elisa M. Tartaglia, Gianluigi Mongillo & Nicolas Brunel - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Gestalt Isomorphism and the Primacy of the Subjective Perceptual Experience.Steven Lehar - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):763-764.
    The Gestalt principle of isomorphism reveals the primacy of subjective experience as a valid source of evidence for the information encoded neurophysiologically. This theory invalidates the abstractionist view that the neurophysiological representation can be of lower dimensionality than the percept to which it gives rise.
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  • Neural Blackboard Architectures of Combinatorial Structures in Cognition.van der Velde Frank & de Kamps Marc - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):37-70.
    Human cognition is unique in the way in which it relies on combinatorial (or compositional) structures. Language provides ample evidence for the existence of combinatorial structures, but they can also be found in visual cognition. To understand the neural basis of human cognition, it is therefore essential to understand how combinatorial structures can be instantiated in neural terms. In his recent book on the foundations of language, Jackendoff described four fundamental problems for a neural instantiation of combinatorial structures: the massiveness (...)
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  • Could Grammatical Encoding and Grammatical Decoding Be Subserved by the Same Processing Module?Gerard Kempen - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):38-39.
    Grodzinsky interprets linguistic differences between agrammatic comprehension and production symptoms as supporting the hypothesis that the mechanisms underlying grammatical encoding (sentence formulation) and grammatical decoding (syntactic parsing) are at least partially distinct. This inference is shown to be premature. A range of experimentally established similarities between the encoding and decoding processes is highlighted, testifying to the viability of the hypothesis that receptive and productive syntactic tasks are performed by the same syntactic processor.
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  • Just Bubbles?Wlodzislaw Duch - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):410-411.
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  • Multiscale Modeling of Brain Dynamics Depends Upon Approximations at Each Scale.J. J. Wright & D. T. J. Liley - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):310-320.
  • Rhythmicity in the EEG and Global Stabilization of the Average Level of Excitation in the Cerebral Cortex.M. N. Zhadin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):309-310.
  • The Form of Chaos in the Noisy Brain Can Manifest Function.Ichiro Tsuda - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):309-309.
  • Is There Chaos in the Brain?Hubert Preissl, Werner Lutzenberger & Friedemann Pulvermüller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):307-308.
  • The EEG Data Indicate Stochastic Nonlinearity.Walter S. Pritchard - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):308-308.
  • Dynamics of the Brain — From the Statistical Properties of Neural Signals to the Development of Representations.Andrew Oliver - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):306-307.
  • Multiscale Neocortical Dynamics, Experimental EEG Measures, and Global Facilitation of Local Cell Assemblies.Paul L. Nunez - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):305-306.
  • Empirical Data Base for Simulation: Firing Rates and Axonal Conduction Velocity for Cortical Neurones.Robert Miller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):304-305.
  • Chaos in Induced Rhythms of the Brain – the Value of ERP Studies.Márk Molnár - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):305-305.
  • Neuromodulation Can Significantly Change the Dynamical State of Cortical Networks.Hans Liljenström - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):303-304.
  • Why Does the Human Brain Need to Be a Nonlinear System?Zbigniew J. Kowalik, Andrzej Wrobel & Andrzej Rydz - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):302-303.
  • Nonlinear Nonequilibrium Nonquantum Nonchaotic Statistical Mechanics of Neocortical Interactions.Lester Ingber - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):300-301.
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  • Comparative Reduction of Theories — or Over-Simplification?Edgar Koerner - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):301-302.
  • Modeling for Modeling's Sake?Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):299-299.
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  • Multiscale Modeling of the Brain Should Be Validated in More Detail Against the Biological Data.Harry R. Erwin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):297-298.
  • Neural System Stability.Walter J. Freeman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):298-299.
  • Levels, Models, and Brain Activities: Neurodynamics is Pluralistic.Péter Érdi - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):296-297.
  • Is the Time Ripe for Integration of Scales?Daniel J. Amit - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):295-296.
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  • Is the Distribution of Coherence a Test of the Model?Theodore H. Bullock - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):296-296.
  • Dynamics of the Brain at Global and Microscopic Scales: Neural Networks and the EEG.J. J. Wright & D. T. J. Liley - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):285-295.
  • Constructing the Relational Mind.John G. Taylor - 1998 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 4.
    The "relational mind" approach to the inner content of consciousness is developed in terms of various control structures and processing strategies and their possible neurobiological identifications in brain sites. This leads naturally to a division of consciousness into a passive and an active part. A global control structure for the "single strand" aspect of consciousness is proposed as the thalamo-nucleus reticularis thalami-cortex coupled system, which is related to experimental data on the electrical stimulation of awareness. Local control, in terms of (...)
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  • Computational Cognitive Neuroscience.Carlos Zednik - forthcoming - In Mark Sprevak & Matteo Colombo (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Computational Mind. Routledge.
    This chapter provides an overview of the basic research strategies and analytic techniques deployed in computational cognitive neuroscience. On the one hand, “top-down” strategies are used to infer, from formal characterizations of behavior and cognition, the computational properties of underlying neural mechanisms. On the other hand, “bottom-up” research strategies are used to identify neural mechanisms and to reconstruct their computational capacities. Both of these strategies rely on experimental techniques familiar from other branches of neuroscience, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-cell (...)
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  • Incubated Cognition and Creativity.Dustin Stokes - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (3):83-100.
    Many traditional theories of creativity put heavy emphasis on an incubation stage in creative cognitive processes. The basic phenomenon is a familiar one: we are working on a task or problem, we leave it aside for some period of time, and when we return attention to the task we have some new insight that services completion of the task. This feature, combined with other ostensibly mysterious features of creativity, has discouraged naturalists from theorizing creativity. This avoidance is misguided: we can (...)
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  • Towards a Computational Theory of Experience.Tomer Fekete & Shimon Edelman - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):807-827.
    A standing challenge for the science of mind is to account for the datum that every mind faces in the most immediate – that is, unmediated – fashion: its phenomenal experience. The complementary tasks of explaining what it means for a system to give rise to experience and what constitutes the content of experience (qualia) in computational terms are particularly challenging, given the multiple realizability of computation. In this paper, we identify a set of conditions that a computational theory must (...)
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  • Attention, Awareness, and the Triangular Circuit.David LaBerge - 1997 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2-3):149-81.
    It is proposed that attention to an object requires the simultaneous activity of three brain regions that are interconnected by a triangular circuit. The regions are the cortical site of attentional expression, the thalamic enhancement structure, and the prefrontal area of control. It is also proposed that awareness of an object requires the additional component of attention directed to a representation of the self. The expression of attention to a self-representation may involve activations of cortical sites corresponding to the body (...)
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  • Early-Connectionism Machines.Roberto Cordeschi - 2000 - AI and Society 14 (3-4):314-330.
    In this paper I put forward a reconstruction of the evolution of certain explanatory hypotheses on the neural basis of association and learning that are the premises of connectionism in the cybernetic age and of present-day connectionism. The main point of my reconstruction is based on two little-known case studies. The first is the project, published in 1913, of a hydraulic machine through which its author believed it was possible to simulate certain essential elements of the plasticity of nervous connections. (...)
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