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  1. Psychopathy, Adaptation, and Disorder.Daniel Brian Krupp, Lindsay A. Sewall, Martin L. Lalumière, Craig Sheriff & Grant T. Harris - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4:1-5.
    In a recent study, we found a negative association between psychopathy and violence against genetic relatives. We interpreted this result as a form of nepotism and argued that it failed to support the hypothesis that psychopathy is a mental disorder, suggesting instead that it supports the hypothesis that psychopathy is an evolved life history strategy. This interpretation and subsequent arguments have been challenged in a number of ways. Here, we identify several misunderstandings regarding the harmful dysfunction definition of mental disorder (...)
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  • Supernatural Beliefs, Unconscious Threat and Judgment Bias in Tibetan Buddhists.Colin Holbrook & Paulo Sousa - 2013 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 13 (1-2):33-56.
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  • The Evolution of Human Mating: Trade-Offs and Strategic Pluralism.Steven W. Gangestad & Jeffry A. Simpson - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):573-587.
    During human evolutionary history, there were “trade-offs” between expending time and energy on child-rearing and mating, so both men and women evolved conditional mating strategies guided by cues signaling the circumstances. Many short-term matings might be successful for some men; others might try to find and keep a single mate, investing their effort in rearing her offspring. Recent evidence suggests that men with features signaling genetic benefits to offspring should be preferred by women as short-term mates, but there are trade-offs (...)
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  • Resolving the Paradox of Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders: Which Evolutionary Genetic Models Work Best?Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):385-404.
    Given that natural selection is so powerful at optimizing complex adaptations, why does it seem unable to eliminate genes (susceptibility alleles) that predispose to common, harmful, heritable mental disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder? We assess three leading explanations for this apparent paradox from evolutionary genetic theory: (1) ancestral neutrality (susceptibility alleles were not harmful among ancestors), (2) balancing selection (susceptibility alleles sometimes increased fitness), and (3) polygenic mutation-selection balance (mental disorders reflect the inevitable mutational load on the thousands (...)
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  • Adaptationism and the Logic of Research Questions: How to Think Clearly About Evolutionary Causes.Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (4):DOI: 10.1007/s13752-015-0214-2.
    This article discusses various dangers that accompany the supposedly benign methods in behavioral evoltutionary biology and evolutionary psychology that fall under the framework of "methodological adaptationism." A "Logic of Research Questions" is proposed that aids in clarifying the reasoning problems that arise due to the framework under critique. The live, and widely practiced, " evolutionary factors" framework is offered as the key comparison and alternative. The article goes beyond the traditional critique of Stephen Jay Gould and Richard C. Lewontin, to (...)
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  • The Bright Side of Being Blue: Depression as an Adaptation for Analyzing Complex Problems.Paul W. Andrews & J. Anderson Thomson - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (3):620-654.
  • Rethinking Innovative Designs to Further Test Parasite-Stress Theory.Ayse K. Uskul - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):93-94.
    Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) parasite-stress theory of sociality is supported largely by correlational evidence; its persuasiveness would increase significantly via lab and natural experiments and demonstrations of its mediating role. How the theory is linked to other approaches to group differences in psychological differences and to production and dissemination of cultural ideas and practices, need further clarification. So does the theory's view on the possible reduction of negative group interactions.
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  • Cognitive Systems for Revenge and Forgiveness.Michael E. McCullough, Robert Kurzban & Benjamin A. Tabak - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):1-15.
    Minimizing the costs that others impose upon oneself and upon those in whom one has a fitness stake, such as kin and allies, is a key adaptive problem for many organisms. Our ancestors regularly faced such adaptive problems. One solution to this problem is to impose retaliatory costs on an aggressor so that the aggressor and other observers will lower their estimates of the net benefits to be gained from exploiting the retaliator in the future. We posit that humans have (...)
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  • The Phylogeny and Ontogeny of Adaptations.E. Dickins Thomas - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):283-284.
    Locke & Bogin (L&B) rightly point to the absence of ontogeny in theories of language evolution. However, they overly rely upon ontogenetic data to isolate components of the language faculty. Only an adaptationist analysis, of the sort seen in evolutionary psychology, can carve language at its joints and lead to testable predictions about how language works.
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  • On the Concept of Animal Innovation and the Challenge of Studying Innovation in the Wild.Grant Ramsey, Meredith L. Bastian & Carel van Schaik - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):425-432.
    The commentaries have both drawn out the implications of, and challenged, our definition and operationalization of innovation. In this response, we reply to these concerns, discuss the differences between our operationalization and the preexisting operationalization if innovation, and make suggestions for the advancement of the challenging and exciting field of animal innovation.
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  • Animal Innovation Defined and Operationalized.Grant Ramsey, Meredith L. Bastian & Carel van Schaik - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):393-407.
    Innovation is a key component of most definitions of culture and intelligence. Additionally, innovations may affect a species' ecology and evolution. Nonetheless, conceptual and empirical work on innovation has only recently begun. In particular, largely because the existing operational definition (first occurrence in a population) requires long-term studies of populations, there has been no systematic study of innovation in wild animals. To facilitate such study, we have produced a new definition of innovation: Innovation is the process that generates in an (...)
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  • Adaptationism for Human Cognition: Strong, Spurious, or Weak?Scott Atran - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (1):39-67.
    Strong adaptationists explore complex organic design as taskspecific adaptations to ancestral environments. This strategy seems best when there is evidence of homology. Weak adaptationists don't assume that complex organic (including cognitive and linguistic) functioning necessarily or primarily represents taskspecific adaptation. This approach to cognition resembles physicists' attempts to deductively explain the most facts with fewest hypotheses. For certain domainspecific competencies (folkbiology) strong adaptationism is useful but not necessary to research. With grouplevel belief systems (religion) strong adaptationism degenerates into spurious notions (...)
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  • Social Constructionism as Cognitive Science.Thomas E. Dickins - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):333–352.
    Social constructionism is a broad position that emphasizes the importance of human social processes in psychology. These processes are generally associated with language and the ability to construct stories that conform to the emergent rules of "language games". This view allows one to espouse a variety of critical postures with regard to realist commitments within the social and behavioural sciences, ranging from outright relativism to a more moderate respect for the "barrier" that linguistic descriptions can place between us and reality. (...)
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  • Biology, Culture and Coevolution: Religion and Language as Case Studies.Francesco Ferretti & Ines Adornetti - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 14 (3-4):305-330.
    The main intent of this paper is to give an account of the relationship between bio-cognition and culture in terms of coevolution, analysing religious beliefs and language evolution as case studies. The established view in cognitive studies is that bio-cognitive systems constitute a constraint for the shaping and the transmission of religious beliefs and linguistic structures. From this point of view, religion and language are by-products or exaptations of processing systems originally selected for other cognitive functions. We criticize such a (...)
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  • The Adaptationist-Byproduct Debate on the Evolution of Religion: Five Misunderstandings of the Adaptationist Program.Richard Sosis - 2009 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 9 (3-4):315-332.
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  • Much to Learn About Teaching: Reconciling Form, Function, Phylogeny, and Development.Michelle Ann Kline - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  • Is God an Adaptation?Hugo Viciana & Pierrick Bourrat - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):397-408.
    In this critical notice to Robert Wright’s The Evolution of God, we focus on the question of whether Wright’s God is one which can be said to be an adaptation in a well defined sense. Thus we evaluate the likelihood of different models of adaptive evolution of cultural ideas in their different levels of selection. Our result is an emphasis on the plurality of mechanisms that may lead to adaptation. By way of conclusion we assess epistemologically some of Wright’s more (...)
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  • Brian Boyd’s Evolutionary Account of Art: Fiction or Future?Jan Verpooten - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (2):176-183.
  • The Biology and Evolution of the Three Psychological Tendencies to Anthropomorphize Biology and Evolution.Marco Antonio Correa Varella - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Parasite-Stress Promotes in-Group Assortative Sociality: The Cases of Strong Family Ties and Heightened Religiosity.Corey L. Fincher & Randy Thornhill - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):61-79.
    Throughout the world people differ in the magnitude with which they value strong family ties or heightened religiosity. We propose that this cross-cultural variation is a result of a contingent psychological adaptation that facilitates in-group assortative sociality in the face of high levels of parasite-stress while devaluing in-group assortative sociality in areas with low levels of parasite-stress. This is because in-group assortative sociality is more important for the avoidance of infection from novel parasites and for the management of infection in (...)
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  • Putting Revenge and Forgiveness in an Evolutionary Context.Michael E. McCullough, Robert Kurzban & Benjamin A. Tabak - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):41-58.
  • Reasoning About Dead Agents Reveals Possible Adaptive Trends.Jesse M. Bering, Katrina McLeod & Todd K. Shackelford - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (4):360-381.
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  • Self-Experimentation as a Source of New Ideas: Ten Examples About Sleep, Mood, Health, and Weight.Seth Roberts - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):227-262.
    Little is known about how to generate plausible new scientific ideas. So it is noteworthy that 12 years of self-experimentation led to the discovery of several surprising cause-effect relationships and suggested a new theory of weight control, an unusually high rate of new ideas. The cause-effect relationships were: (1) Seeing faces in the morning on television decreased mood in the evening (>10 hrs later) and improved mood the next day (>24 hrs later), yet had no detectable effect before that (0–10 (...)
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  • Boot Camp for the Brain.Gary L. Brase - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):402.
  • Kampourakis, K. : The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators.Charbel N. El-Hani - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (6):1381-1402.
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  • The Morning After the Night Before.Anne Campbell - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):157-173.
    Benefits to females of short-term mating have recently been identified, and it has been suggested that women have evolved adaptations for this strategy. One piece of evidence supporting such a female adaptation would be that women find the experience of a one-night stand as affectively positive as men. Individuals (N = 1,743) who had experienced a one-night stand were asked to rate aspects of their “morning after” feelings (six positive and six negative). Women were significantly more negative and less positive (...)
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  • The Evolutionary Significance of the Arts: Exploring the By-Product Hypothesis in the Context of Ritual, Precursors, and Cultural Evolution.Derek Hodgson & Jan Verpooten - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (1):73-85.
    The role of the arts has become crucial to understanding the origins of “modern human behavior,” but continues to be highly controversial as it is not always clear why the arts evolved and persisted. This issue is often addressed by appealing to adaptive biological explanations. However, we will argue that the arts have evolved culturally rather than biologically, exploiting biological adaptations rather than extending them. In order to support this line of inquiry, evidence from a number of disciplines will be (...)
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  • Behavioral Innovation and Phylogeography.Pierre Deleporte - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):408-409.
    Indirect identification of innovations in wild populations involves inferring past, unobserved behavioral events. Such historical inference can make simple use of present distribution patterns of differently behaving individuals, but population genetic studies are a potential source of complementary relevant information. Methodological lessons can be taken from phylogeography, that is, molecular approaches to the history of population spatial distribution patterns and gene flows. Opportunities for such studies in primates should increase with the developing population genetic studies used for management and conservation (...)
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  • Testing the Controversy.Joshua M. Tybur, Geoffrey F. Miller & Steven W. Gangestad - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (4):313-328.
    Critics of evolutionary psychology and sociobiology have advanced an adaptationists-as-right-wing-conspirators (ARC) hypothesis, suggesting that adaptationists use their research to support a right-wing political agenda. We report the first quantitative test of the ARC hypothesis based on an online survey of political and scientific attitudes among 168 US psychology Ph.D. students, 31 of whom self-identified as adaptationists and 137 others who identified with another non-adaptationist meta-theory. Results indicate that adaptationists are much less politically conservative than typical US citizens and no more (...)
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  • Male Sexual Strategies Modify Ratings of Female Models with Specific Waist-to-Hip Ratios.Gary L. Brase & Gary Walker - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (2):209-224.
    Female waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) has generally been an important general predictor of ratings of physical attractiveness and related characteristics. Individual differences in ratings do exist, however, and may be related to differences in the reproductive tactics of the male raters such as pursuit of short-term or long-term relationships and adjustments based on perceptions of one’s own quality as a mate. Forty males, categorized according to sociosexual orientation and physical qualities (WHR, Body Mass Index, and self-rated desirability), rated female models on (...)
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  • Pre-Adjustment of Adult Attachment Style to Extrinsic Risk Levels Via Early Attachment Style is Neither Specific, nor Reliable, nor Effective, and is Thus Not an Adaptation.Johannes Hönekopp - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):31-31.
    The mechanism proposed by Del Giudice by which adult attachment style is adapted to the extrinsic risk in the local environment via attachment style during the early years does not fulfill important criteria of an adaptation. The proposed mechanism is neither specific, nor developmentally reliable, nor effective. Therefore, it should not be considered an adaptation.
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