Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Evolutionary Psychiatry and Depression: Testing Two Hypotheses.Somogy Varga - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):41-52.
    In the last few decades, there has been a genuine ‘adaptive turn’ in psychiatry, resulting in evolutionary accounts for an increasing number of psychopathologies. In this paper, I explore the advantages and problems with the two main evolutionary approaches to depression, namely the mismatch and persistence accounts . I will argue that while both evolutionary theories of depression might provide some helpful perspectives, the accounts also harbor significant flaws that might question their authority and usefulness as explanations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Testing the Analytical Rumination Hypothesis: Exploring the Longitudinal Effects of Problem Solving Analysis on Depression.Marcela Sevcikova, Marta M. Maslej, Jiri Stipl, Paul W. Andrews, Martin Pastrnak, Gabriela Vechetova, Magda Bartoskova & Marek Preiss - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Trauma or Drama: A Predictive Processing Perspective on the Continuum of Stress.Valery Krupnik - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Darwinism and Meaning.Lonnie W. Aarssen - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):296-311.
    Darwinism presents a paradox. It discredits the notion that one’s life has any intrinsic meaning, yet it predicts that we are designed by Darwinian natural selection to generally insist that it must—and so necessarily designed to misunderstand and doubt Darwinism. The implications of this paradox are explored here, including the question of where then does the Darwinist find meaning in life? The main source, it is proposed, is from cognitive domains for meaning inherited from sentient ancestors—domains that reveal our evolved (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Darwinism and Meaning.Lonnie W. Aarssen - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):296-311.
    Darwinism presents a paradox. It discredits the notion that one’s life has any intrinsic meaning, yet it predicts that we are designed by Darwinian natural selection to generally insist that it must—and so necessarily designed to misunderstand and doubt Darwinism. The implications of this paradox are explored here, including the question of where then does the Darwinist find meaning in life? The main source, it is proposed, is from cognitive domains for meaning inherited from sentient ancestors—domains that reveal our evolved (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Why Do People With Depression Use Faulty Emotion Regulation Strategies?Sunkyung Yoon & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):118-128.
    Why do people with psychopathology use less adaptive and more maladaptive strategies for negative emotions if such usage has self-destructive consequences? Although researchers have examined the reasons for people’s engagement in maladaptive “behaviors,” such as nonsuicidal self-injury, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the reasons why people might endorse maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. This article addresses this question, focusing on the case of depression, evaluating an array of 10 possible explanations. After considering the existing evidence, we provide a blueprint (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Evolutionary Psychiatry and Nosology: Prospects and Limitations.Luc Faucher - 2012 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 7.
    In this paper, I explain why evolutionary psychiatry is not where the next revolution in psychiatry will come from. I will proceed as follows. Firstly, I will review some of the problems commonly attributed to current nosologies, more specifically to the DSM. One of these problems is the lack of a clear and consensual definition of mental disorder; I will then examine specific attempts to spell out such a definition that use the evolutionary framework. One definition that deserves particular attention, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Depression and the Problem of Absent Desires.Ian Tully - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (2):1-16.
    I argue that consideration of certain cases of severe depression reveals a problem for desire-based theories of welfare. I first show that depression can result in a person losing her desires and then identify a case wherein it seems right to think that, as a result of very severe depression, the individuals described no longer have any desires whatsoever. I argue that the state these people are in is a state of profound ill-being: their lives are going very poorly for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Is Depressive Rumination Rational?Timothy Lane & Georg Northoff - 2016 - In T. W. Hung & T. J. Lane (eds.), Rationality: Constraints and Contexts. Oxford, UK: Elsevier. pp. 121-145.
    Most mental disorders affect only a small segment of the population. On the reasonable assumption that minds or brains are prone to occasional malfunction, these disorders do not seem to pose distinctive explanatory problems. Depression, however, because it is so prevalent and costly, poses a conundrum that some try to explain by characterizing it as an adaptation—a trait that exists because it performed fitness-enhancing functions in ancestral populations. Heretofore, proposed evolutionary explanations of depression did not focus on thought processes; instead, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Future Generations and the Justifiability of Germline Engineering.Ioana Petre - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (3):328-341.
    The possibility of performing germline modifications on currently living individuals targets future generations’ health and well-being by reducing the diversity of the human gene pool. This can have two negative repercussions: reduction of heterozygosity, the latter being associated with a health or performance advantage; uniformization of the genes involved in reproductive recombination, which may lead to the health risks involved in asexual reproduction. I argue that germline interventions aimed at modifying the genomes of future people cannot be ethically justifiable if (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Hypernatural Monitoring: A Social Rehearsal Account of Smartphone Addiction.Samuel P. L. Veissière & Moriah Stendel - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Emotional Aging: A Discrete Emotions Perspective.Ute Kunzmann, Cathleen Kappes & Carsten Wrosch - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Upside to Feeling Worse Than Average (WTA): A Conceptual Framework to Understand When, How, and for Whom WTA Beliefs Have Long-Term Benefits.Ashley V. Whillans, Alexander H. Jordan & Frances S. Chen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of Body Image in Internalizing Mental Health Problems in Spanish Adolescents: An Analysis According to Sex, Age, and Socioeconomic Status.Pilar Ramos, Concepción Moreno-Maldonado, Carmen Moreno & Francisco Rivera - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emotional Influences on Cognitive Flexibility Depend on Individual Differences: A Combined Micro-Phenomenological and Psychophysiological Study.Alejandra Vásquez-Rosati, Rodrigo Montefusco-Siegmund, Vladimir López & Diego Cosmelli - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Building a House of Sentiment on Sand: Epistemological Issues with Contempt.Heather C. Lench, Shane W. Bench & Kenneth A. Perez - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Integration of Negative Experiences: A Neuropsychological Framework for Human Resilience.Markus Quirin, Martha Kent, Maarten A. S. Boksem & Mattie Tops - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Value of Unhappiness.Christine Vitrano - 2016 - Think 15 (44):29-40.
  • Evolutionary Mechanisms for Loneliness.John T. Cacioppo, Stephanie Cacioppo & Dorret I. Boomsma - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (1):3-21.
  • Happiness and Well-Being: Shifting the Focus of the Current Debate.Raffaele Rodogno - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):433-446.
    The point of departure of this paper is the recently emphasised distinction between psychological theories of happiness, on the one hand, and normative theories of well-being, on the other. With this distinction in mind, I examine three possible kinds of relation that might exist between (psychological) happiness and (normative) well-being; to wit, happiness may be understood as playing a central part in (1) a formal theory of well-being, (2) a substantive theory of well-being or (3) as an indicator for well-being. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Troubling Anomalies and Exciting Conjectures: A Bipolar Model of Scientific Discovery.Bruno R. Bocanegra - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (2).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anxiety and Depression: Toward Overlapping and Distinctive Features.Michael W. Eysenck & Małgorzata Fajkowska - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (7):1391-1400.
    ABSTRACTThis Special Issue of Cognition and Emotion addresses one of the cardinal concerns of affective science, which is overlapping and distinctive features of anxiety and depression. A central finding in the study of anxiety and depression is that they are moderately highly correlated with each other. This leads us to the question: What is behind this co-occurrence? Possible explanations relate to poor discriminant validity of measures; both emotional states are associated with negative affect; stressful life events; impaired cognitive processes; they (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • For Love or Money? What Motivates People to Know the Minds of Others?Kate L. Harkness, Jill A. Jacobson, Brooke Sinclair, Emilie Chan & Mark A. Sabbagh - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):541-549.