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On the Inextricability of the Context of Discovery and the Context of Justification

In Jutta Schickore & Friedrich Steinle (eds.), Revisiting Discovery and Justification. Springer. pp. 215--230 (2006)

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  1. Discovery of Causal Mechanisms: Oxidative Phosphorylation and the Calvin-Benson Cycle.Raphael Scholl & Kärin Nickelsen - unknown
    We investigate the context of discovery of two significant achievements of 20th century biochemistry: the chemiosmotic mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation and the dark reaction of photosynthesis. The pursuit of these problems involved discovery strategies such as the transfer, recombination and reversal of previous causal and mechanistic knowledge in biochemistry. We study the operation and scope of these strategies by careful historical analysis, reaching a number of systematic conclusions: 1) Even basic strategies can illuminate "hard cases" of scientific discovery that go (...)
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  • What’s in It for the Historian of Science? Reflections on the Value of Philosophy of Science for History of Science.Theodore Arabatzis - 2017 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 31 (1):69-82.
    In this article, I explore the value of philosophy of science for history of science. I start by introducing a distinction between two ways of integrating history and philosophy of science: historical philosophy of science and philosophical history of science. I then offer a critical discussion of Imre Lakatos’s project to bring philosophy of science to bear on historical interpretation. I point out certain flaws in Lakatos’s project, which I consider indicative of what went wrong with PHS in the past. (...)
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  • Models in Search of Targets: Exploratory Modelling and the Case of Turing Patterns.Axel Gelfert - 2018 - In A. Christian, David Hommen, N. Retzlaff & Gerhard Schurz (eds.), Philosophy of Science. European Studies in Philosophy of Science, vol 9. Springer International Publishing. pp. 245-269.
    Traditional frameworks for evaluating scientific models have tended to downplay their exploratory function; instead they emphasize how models are inherently intended for specific phenomena and are to be judged by their ability to predict, reproduce, or explain empirical observations. By contrast, this paper argues that exploration should stand alongside explanation, prediction, and representation as a core function of scientific models. Thus, models often serve as starting points for future inquiry, as proofs of principle, as sources of potential explanations, and as (...)
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  • Evaluating the Quantum Postulate in the Context of Pursuit.M. Kao Molly - unknown
    The purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to our understanding of scientific theory pursuit by providing a detailed case study on the development of early quantum theory, from roughly 1900 to 1916. I first elaborate on why this case should be considered an instance of piecemeal pursuit by presenting the historical quantum conjectures that were being used in different contexts. These conjectures gave varied interpretations of quantization. By comparing these conjectures, I identify a general quantum postulate that captures the (...)
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  • Reception and Discovery: The Nature of Johann Wilhelm Ritter’s Invisible Rays.Jan Frercks, Heiko Weber & Gerhard Wiesenfeldt - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):143-156.
    Ultraviolet radiation is generally considered to have been discovered by Johann Wilhelm Ritter in 1801. In this article, we study the reception of Ritter’s experiment during the first decade after the event—Ritter’s remaining lifetime. Drawing on the attributional model of discovery, we are interested in whether the German physicists and chemists granted Ritter’s observation the status of a discovery and, if so, of what. Two things are remarkable concerning the early reception, and both have to do more with neglect than (...)
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