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Shirley Ardener (1975). Perceiving Women.

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  1.  19
    When West Writes East: In Search of an Ethic for Cross-Cultural Interviewing.Rick Kenney & Kimiko Akita - 2008 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (4):280 – 295.
    Cross-cultural interviewing can pose challenges for journalists, given potential differences in language, word choice, volume, body posture, and group dynamics. This article explores some of the complexities of cross-cultural interviews with the dual aim of heightening awareness of ethical considerations for journalists who conduct them and of discussing ethical principles that may help in guiding their work. This article attempts to move the discussion of cross-cultural interviews beyond traditional Western ethics. Eastern moral philosophy and ideals of trust and human relations (...)
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  2.  61
    Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference.Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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    Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language of Difference.Joyce Davidson & Mick Smith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  4.  10
    Systems of Knowledge as Systems of Domination: The Limitations of Established Meaning. [REVIEW]Kristin Cashman - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):49-58.
    The hegemony of Western science, inherent in international development projects, often increases the poverty and oppression of Third World women by pre-empting alternative realities. In African and Asian agrarian societies women grow from 60 to 90% of the food (World Bank, 1989); they hold incredible potential to increase food production. Their ability to operate under more marginal conditions than their male counterparts would seem to indicate that they have developed valuable knowledge— knowledge often generated in response to limited access to (...)
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  5.  36
    Gender is an Organon.Alice B. Kehoe - 1990 - Zygon 25 (2):139-150.
    . Gender is a social construct. Technically, it is a grammatical structuring category that may refer to sex, as is typical of Indo‐European languages, or to another set of features such as animate versus inanimate, as is typical of Algonkian languages. Gender in language forces speakers of the language to be continually conscious of application of the category, and they tend to project the categorization into their experience of the world and collocate observations under these broad categories. Western science has (...)
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  6.  11
    The Politics of Women's Studies and Men's Studies.Mary Libertin - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (2):143 - 152.
    This paper is a response to the problematic relation between men's studies and women's studies; it is also a particular response to Harry Brod's discussion of the theoretical need for men's studies programs in his article "The New Men's Studies: From Feminist Theory to Gender Scholarship." The paper argues that a male feminist would be more effective in a women's studies program, that the latter already includes research about the experiences of both males and females. Although future research on both (...)
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