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  1. Self‐Determination And Sovereignty Over Natural Resources.Oliviero Angeli - 2016 - Ratio Juris:290-304.
    This article makes the normative case for a differentiated approach to the sovereignty of states over natural resources. In the first half of the article, drawing on the example of the Yasuní-ITT-Initiative, I will argue that countries commit a moral wrong when they exploit natural resources for their own benefit, but that they have the moral right to do so given the current structure of the international system. In the second half of the article, I address the question of whether (...)
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  • Introduction: Justice, Climate Change, and the Distribution of Natural Resources.Fabian Schuppert - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):3-8.
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  • Allocating the Burdens of Climate Action: Consumption-Based Carbon Accounting and the Polluter-Pays Principle.Ross Mittiga - 2019 - In Beth Edmondson & Stuart Levy (eds.), Transformative Climates and Accountable Governance. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 157-194.
    Action must be taken to combat climate change. Yet, how the costs of climate action should be allocated among states remains a question. One popular answer—the polluter-pays principle (PPP)—stipulates that those responsible for causing the problem should pay to address it. While intuitively plausible, the PPP has been subjected to withering criticism in recent years. It is timely, following the Paris Agreement, to develop a new version: one that does not focus on historical production-based emissions but rather allocates climate burdens (...)
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  • Self-Determination and Resource Rights: In Defence of Territorial Jurisdiction Over Natural Resources.Ayelet Banai - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):9-20.
    Is territorial jurisdiction over natural resources justified? This paper argues that a freedom-based account of self-determination coupled with ‘functionalist’ justifications of territorial right support territorial jurisdiction over natural resources. This justification simultaneously gives rise to limits on the permissible exercise of the right: the principles of reciprocity and generality, and of equal freedom. This ‘reciprocal’ view on territorial jurisdiction over natural resources, defended here, differs from two alternatives: the traditional sovereignty view on the one hand and the transnational jurisdiction view—which (...)
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  • Sovereignty Over Natural Resources.Ioannis Kouris - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
  • Is Canada Entitled to the Arctic?Margaret Moore - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (1):98-113.
    This article is interested in the general question of what justifies territorial rights over unoccupied places, including places that are not occupied but are situated within the territorial borders of a state. This question arises because one of the most common defenses of rights over territory makes use of the idea of occupancy and has difficulty explaining such rights in places that are not occupied. It explores this question through an examination of the claims and arguments in the Canadian Arctic, (...)
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  • Carbon Sink Conservation and Global Justice: Benefitting, Free Riding and Non-Compliance.Fabian Schuppert - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):99-116.
    It is often assumed that in order to avoid the most severe consequences of global anthropogenic climate change we have to preserve our existing carbon sinks, such as for instance tropical forests. Global carbon sink conservation raises a host of normative issues, though, since it is debatable who should pay the costs of carbon sink conservation, who has the duty to protect which sinks, and how far the duty to conserve one’s carbon sinks actually extends, especially if it conflicts with (...)
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  • Qui Bono? Justice in the Distribution of the Benefits and Burdens of Avoided Deforestation.Ed Page - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):83-97.
    In this paper, I explore the question of how the costs of undertaking an important type of climate change mitigation should be shared amongst states seeking an environmentally effective and equitable response to global climate change. While much of the normative literature on climate mitigation has focused on burden sharing within the context of reductions in emissions of greenhouse gas, I explore the question of how the costs of protecting tropical forests in order to harness their climate mitigation potential should (...)
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