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Roman Stoicism

Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press (1911)

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  1. Seneca’s Philosophical Predecessors and Contemporaries.John Sellars - 2014 - In Gregor Damschen & A. Heil (eds.), Brill's Companion to Seneca. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 97-112.
    This chapter examines the philosophical context in which Seneca thought and wrote, drawing primarily on evidence within Seneca's works. It considers Seneca's immediate teachers, his debt to the Stoic tradition, other Greek philosophical influences, and other contemporary philosophers.
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  • Stoicism, Feminism and Autonomy.Scott Aikin & Emily McGill-Rutherford - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (1):9-22.
    The ancient Stoics had an uneven track record with regard to women’s standing. On the one hand, they recognized women as fully capable of rationality and virtue. On the other hand, they continued to hold that women’s roles were in the home. These views are consistent, given Stoic value theory, but are unacceptable on liberal feminist grounds. Stoic value theory, given different emphasis on the ethical role of choice, is shown to be capable of satisfying the liberal feminist requirement that (...)
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  • Stoicism Bibliography.Ronald H. Epp - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):125-171.
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  • Marcus Aurelius, the Stoic Ethic, and Adam Smith.Harold B. Jones - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):89 - 96.
    In The Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS) Adam Smith draws on the Stoic idea of a Providence that uses everything for the good of the whole. The process is often painful, so the Stoic ethic insisted on conscious cooperation. Stoic ideas contributed to the rise of science and enjoyed wide popularity in Smith's England. Smith was more influenced by the Stoicism of his professors than by the Epicureanism of Hume. In TMS, Marcus Aurelius's "helmsman" becomes the "impartial spectator," who judges (...)
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  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.