Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Complexity of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]M. Berghs - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):441-446.
    In this literature review, a picture is given of the complexity of nursing attitudes toward euthanasia. The myriad of data found in empirical literature is mostly framed within a polarised debate and inconclusive about the complex reality behind attitudes toward euthanasia. Yet, a further examination of the content as well as the context of attitudes is more revealing. The arguments for euthanasia have to do with quality of life and respect for autonomy. Arguments against euthanasia have to do with non-maleficence, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • French Hospital Nurses' Opinion About Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A National Phone Survey.M. K. Bendiane, A.-D. Bouhnik, A. Galinier, R. Favre, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):238-244.
    Background: Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient’s request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses’ opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. Methods: A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Nurses' Views on Their Involvement in Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study in Flanders (Belgium).B. Dierckx De Casterle - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):187-192.
    Background: Although nurses worldwide are confronted with euthanasia requests from patients, the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in euthanasia remain unclear.Objectives: In depth exploration of the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in the entire care process surrounding euthanasia.Design: A qualitative Grounded Theory strategy was used.Setting and participants: In anticipation of new Belgian legislation on euthanasia, we conducted semistructured interviews with 12 nurses working in a palliative care setting in the province of Vlaams-Brabant .Results: Palliative (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Practice: A Survey of Doctors in Victoria (Australia).D. A. Neil, C. A. J. Coady, J. Thompson & H. Kuhse - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):721-725.
    Objectives: To discover the current state of opinion and practice among doctors in Victoria, Australia, regarding end-of-life decisions and the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Longitudinal comparison with similar 1987 and 1993 studies.Design and participants: Cross-sectional postal survey of doctors in Victoria.Results: 53% of doctors in Victoria support the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Of doctors who have experienced requests from patients to hasten death, 35% have administered drugs with the intention of hastening death. There is substantial disagreement among doctors concerning the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • When is Physician Assisted Suicide or Euthanasia Acceptable?S. Frileux - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):330-336.
    Objectives: To discover what factors affect lay people’s judgments of the acceptability of physician assisted suicide and euthanasia and how these factors interact.Design: Participants rated the acceptability of either physician assisted suicide or euthanasia for 72 patient vignettes with a five factor design—that is, all combinations of patient’s age ; curability of illness ; degree of suffering ; patient’s mental status , and extent of patient’s requests for the procedure .Participants: Convenience sample of 66 young adults, 62 middle aged adults, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Finnish Nurses’ Attitudes Towards Their Role in the Euthanasia Process.Anja Terkamo-Moisio, Chris Gastmans, Olli-Pekka Ryynänen & Anna-Maija Pietilä - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301772085.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nurses’ Attitudes Towards Euthanasia in Conflict with Professional Ethical Guidelines.Anja Terkamo-Moisio, Tarja Kvist, Mari Kangasniemi, Teuvo Laitila, Olli-Pekka Ryynänen & Anna-Maija Pietilä - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):70-86.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Opinions About Euthanasia.Gülşah Kumaş, Gürsel Öztunç & Z. Nazan Alparslan - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (5):637-650.
    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Operationalisation of Religion and World View in Surveys of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Joris Gielen, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):423-431.
    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses’ attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the respondents (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Qualitative Analysis of Ethical Problems Experienced by Physicians and Nurses in Intensive Care Units in Turkey.Nesrin Çobanoğlu & Lale Algıer - 2004 - Nursing Ethics 11 (5):444-458.
    In this qualitative study, we aimed to identify and compare the ethical problems perceived by physicians and nurses in intensive care units at Baskent University hospitals in Turkey. A total of 21 physicians and 22 nurses were asked to describe ethical problems that they frequently encounter in their practice. The data were analyzed using an interactive model. The core problem for both physicians and nurses was end-of-life decisions (first level). In this category, physicians were most frequently concerned with euthanasia while (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]Charlotte Verpoort, Chris Gastmans, Nele De Bal & Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé - 2004 - Nursing Ethics 11 (4):349-365.
    This article provides an overview of the scarce international literature concerning nurses’ attitudes to euthanasia. Studies show large differences with respect to the percentage of nurses who are (not) in favour of euthanasia. Characteristics such as age, religion and nursing specialty have a significant influence on a nurse’s opinion. The arguments for euthanasia have to do with quality of life, respect for autonomy and dissatisfaction with the current situation. Arguments against euthanasia are the right to a good death, belief in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations