Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Spirituality and nursing: a reductionist approach: Original article.John Paley - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):3-18.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Affect, Belief, and the Arts.Rami Gabriel - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    The cultural project is a therapeutic melding of emotion, symbols, and knowledge. In this paper, I describe how spiritual emotions engendered through encounters in imaginative culture enable fixation of metaphysical beliefs. Evolved affective systems are domesticated through the social practices of imaginative culture so as to adapt people to live in culturally defined cooperative groups. Conditioning, as well as tertiary-level cognitive capacities such as symbols and language are enlisted to bond groups through the imaginative formats of myth and participatory ritual. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Do Religious Beliefs Have a Place within an ‘Epistemically Naturalized’ Cognitive System?Graham Wood - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):539-556.
  • Cognitive Science and Religious Belief.Graham Wood - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (10):734-745.
    The cognitive science of religion draws on insights from evolutionary psychology, and offers explanations of religious belief based on natural cognitive processes. This article examines a number of competing explanations of religious belief by considering it as a solution to the challenge of cooperation. The challenge of stopping individuals cheating within a cooperative group has been a problem throughout humanity’s evolutionary history. Empirical evidence drawn from fields such as anthropology and psychology suggests that religious beliefs are part of an evolved (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Representation of Agents in Auditory Verbal Hallucinations.Sam Wilkinson & Vaughan Bell - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (1):104-126.
    Current models of auditory verbal hallucinations tend to focus on the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, but often fail to address the content of the auditory experience. In other words, they tend to ask why there are AVHs at all, instead of asking why, given that there are AVHs, they have the properties that they have. One such property, which has been largely overlooked and which we will focus on here, is why the voices are often experienced as coming from agents, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Testing major evolutionary hypotheses about religion with a random sample.David Sloan Wilson - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (4):382-409.
  • Memory and Belief in the Transmission of Counterintuitive Content.Aiyana K. Willard, Joseph Henrich & Ara Norenzayan - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (3):221-243.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Is God an Adaptation?: Robert Wright’s, The Evolution of God, Little Brown, 2009.Hugo Viciana & Pierrick Bourrat - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):397-408.
    In this critical notice to Robert Wright’s The Evolution of God, we focus on the question of whether Wright’s God is one which can be said to be an adaptation in a well defined sense. Thus we evaluate the likelihood of different models of adaptive evolution of cultural ideas in their different levels of selection. Our result is an emphasis on the plurality of mechanisms that may lead to adaptation. By way of conclusion we assess epistemologically some of Wright’s more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Predictive coding and religious belief.Hans Van Eyghen - 2018 - Filosofia Unisinos 19 (3).
    In this paper I investigate the epistemic implications of a recent theory of religious cognition that draws on predictive coding. The theory argues that certain experiences are heavily shaped by a subject’s prior (religious) beliefs and thereby makes religious believers prone to detect invisible agents. The theory is an update of older theories of religious cognition but departs from them in crucial ways. I will assess the epistemic implications by reformulating existing arguments based on other (older) theories of religious cognition.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anthropology in the Cognitive Sciences: The Value of Diversity.Sara J. Unsworth - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):429-436.
    Beller, Bender, and Medin (this issue) offer a provocative proposal outlining several reasons why anthropology and the rest of cognitive science might consider parting ways. Among those reasons, they suggest that separation might maintain the diversity needed to address larger problems facing humanity, and that the research strategies used across the disciplines are already so diverse as to be incommensurate. The present paper challenges the view that research strategies are incommensurate and offers a multimethod approach to cultural research that can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Does cognitive science show belief in god to be irrational? The epistemic consequences of the cognitive science of religion.Joshua C. Thurow - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):77-98.
    The last 15 years or so has seen the development of a fascinating new area of cognitive science: the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Scientists in this field aim to explain religious beliefs and various other religious human activities by appeal to basic cognitive structures that all humans possess. The CSR scientific theories raise an interesting philosophical question: do they somehow show that religious belief, more specifically belief in a god of some kind, is irrational? In this paper I investigate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • The Emotional Coherence of Religion.Paul Thagard - 2005 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 5 (1-2):58-74.
    This paper uses a psychological/computational theory of emotional coherence to explain several aspects of religious belief and practice. After reviewing evidence for the importance of emotion to religious thought and cognition in general, it describes psychological and social mechanisms of emotional cognition. These mechanisms are relevant to explaining the acquisition and maintenance of religious belief, and also shed light on such practices as prayer and other rituals. These psychological explanations are contrasted with ones based on biological evolution.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • The cognitive science of religion: Implications for morality.John Teehan - 2018 - Filosofia Unisinos 19 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The evolutionary basis of religious ethics.John Teehan - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):747-774.
  • Reverse Engineering Complex Cultural Concepts: Identifying Building Blocks of “Religion”.Ann Taves - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 15 (1-2):191-216.
    Researchers have not yet done an adequate job of reverse engineering the complex cultural concepts of religion and spirituality in a way that allows scientists to operationalize component parts and historians of religion to consider how the component parts have been synthesized into larger socio-cultural wholes. Doing so involves two steps: distinguishing between the generic elements that structure definitions and the specific features used to characterize the generic elements as “religious” or “sacred” and disaggregating these specific features into more basic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Effective untestability and bounded rationality help in seeing religion as adaptive misbelief.Konrad Talmont-Kaminski - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):536-537.
    McKay & Dennett (M&D) look for adaptive misbeliefs that result from the normal, though fallible, functioning of human cognition. Their account can be substantially improved by the addition of two elements: (1) significance of a belief's testability for its functionality, and (2) an account of reason appropriate to understanding systemic misbelief. Together, these points show why religion probably is an adaptive misbelief.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Fitness Relevance of Counterintuitive Agents.Thomas Swan & Jamin Halberstadt - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):188-217.
    Cognitive scientists have attributed the ubiquity of religious narratives partly to the favored recall of minimally counterintuitive concepts within those narratives. Yet, this memory bias is inconsistent, sometimes absent, and without a functional rationale. Here, we asked if MCI concepts are more fitness relevant than intuitive concepts, and if fitness relevance can explain the existence and variability of the observed memory bias. In three studies, participants rated the potential threat and potential opportunity afforded by agents with abilities that violated folk (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Naturalize or Not to Naturalize? An Issue for Cognitive Science as Well as Anthropology.Keith Stenning - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):413-419.
    Several of Beller, Bender, and Medin’s (2012) issues are as relevant within cognitive science as between it and anthropology. Knowledge-rich human mental processes impose hermeneutic tasks, both on subjects and researchers. Psychology's current philosophy of science is ill suited to analyzing these: Its demand for ‘‘stimulus control’’ needs to give way to ‘‘negotiation of mutual interpretation.’’ Cognitive science has ways to address these issues, as does anthropology. An example from my own work is about how defeasible logics are mathematical models (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Religion: Its Origins, Social Role and Sources of Variation.Richard Startup - 2020 - Open Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):346-367.
    Religion emerged among early humans because both purposive and non-purposive explanations were being employed but understanding was lacking of their precise scope and limits. Given also a context of very limited human power, the resultant foregrounding of agency and purposive explanation expressed itself in religion’s marked tendency towards anthropomorphism and its key role in legitimizing behaviour. The inevitability of death also structures the religious outlook; with ancestors sometimes assigned a role in relation to the living. Subjective elements such as the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Adaptationist-Byproduct Debate on the Evolution of Religion: Five Misunderstandings of the Adaptationist Program.Richard Sosis - 2009 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 9 (3-4):315-332.
    The primary debate among scholars who study the evolution of religion concerns whether religion is an adaptation or a byproduct. The dominant position in the field is that religious beliefs and behaviors are byproducts of cognitive processes and behaviors that evolved for other purposes. A smaller group of scholars maintain that religion is an adaptation for extending human cooperation and coordination. Here I survey five critiques of the adapationist position and offer responses to these critiques. Much of the debate can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Cultural Attraction in Film Evolution: the Case of Anachronies.Oleg Sobchuk & Peeter Tinits - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):218-237.
    In many films, story is presented in an order different from chronological. Deviations from the chronological order in a narrative are called anachronies. Narratological theory and the evidence from psychological experiments indicate that anachronies allow stories to be more interesting, as the non-chronological order evokes curiosity in viewers. In this paper we investigate the historical dynamics in the use of anachronies in film. Particularly, we follow the cultural attraction theory that suggests that, given certain conditions, cultural evolution should conform to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Emil Brunner revisited: On the cognitive science of religion, the imago Dei, and revelation.Taede A. Smedes - 2014 - Zygon 49 (1):190-207.
    This article aims at a constructive and argumentative engagement between the cognitive science of religion (CSR) and philosophical and theological reflection on the imago Dei. The Swiss theologian Emil Brunner argued that the theological notion that humans were created in the image of God entails that there is a “point of contact” for revelation to occur. This article argues that Brunner's notion resonates quite strongly with the findings of the CSR. The first part will give a short overview of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Spandrels, Gazelles and Flying Buttresses: Religion as Adaptation or as a By-Product.Tom Sjöblom - 2007 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 7 (3-4):293-312.
    This article discusses recent naturalistic theories of religion from the viewpoint of how the deal with the issue of the origins of religion. It will be argued that the theories can be divided according to if they view religion as being an adaptation or not, on the other hand, and if they consider it to be mostly natural or cultural on the other. On the basis of this discussion, it is suggested that a cognitive mechanism referred to here as the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Are Dennett’s Evolutionary Debunking By-Producing Arguments against the Rationality of Theism Valid?Jorge Sierra Merchán - 2017 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 26:178-209.
    Resumen Recientemente la ciencia cognitiva de la religión ha permitido desarrollar argumentos evolutivos desacreditadores, los cuales buscan poner en entredicho no solo la racionalidad sino la verdad del teísmo. Dado que hay dos formas de concebir la racionalidad y la justificación epistémicas, a saber, la internalista y la externalista, cabe preguntarse ¿de qué modo tales argumentos afectan al teísmo? El objetivo de este artículo es responder a esta cuestión mediante una reconstrucción y evaluación de tres argumentos evolutivos desacreditadores subproductistas contra (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thinking about biology. Modular constraints on categorization and reasoning in the everyday life of Americans, Maya, and scientists.Scott Atran, Douglas I. Medin & Norbert Ross - 2002 - Mind and Society 3 (2):31-63.
    This essay explores the universal cognitive bases of biological taxonomy and taxonomic inference using cross-cultural experimental work with urbanized Americans and forest-dwelling Maya Indians. A universal, essentialist appreciation of generic species appears as the causal foundation for the taxonomic arrangement of biodiversity, and for inference about the distribution of causally-related properties that underlie biodiversity. Universal folkbiological taxonomy is domain-specific: its structure does not spontaneously or invariably arise in other cognitive domains, like substances, artifacts or persons. It is plausibly an innately-determined (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Cognitive Adaptation: Insights from a Pragmatist Perspective.Jay Schulkin - 2008 - Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):39-59.
    Classical pragmatism construed mind as an adaptive organ rooted in biology; biology was not one side and culture on the other. The cognitive systems underlie adaptation in response to the precarious and in the search for the stable and more secure that result in diverse forms of inquiry. Cognitive systems are rooted in action, and classical pragmatism knotted our sense of ourselves in response to nature and our cultural evolution. Cognitive systems should be demythologized away from Cartesian detachment, and towards (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Charles Darwin’s O n the Origin of Species.Michael Ruse - 2007 - Topoi 26 (1):159-165.
  • Mythic religious naturalism.William A. Rottschaefer - 2007 - Zygon 42 (2):369-408.
  • Supernaturalizing Social Life.Matt J. Rossano - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (3):272-294.
    This paper examines three ancient traits of religion whose origins likely date back to the Upper Paleolithic: ancestor worship, shamanism, and the belief in natural and animal spirits. Evidence for the emergence of these traits coincides with evidence for a dramatic advance in human social cooperation. It is argued that these traits played a role in the evolution of human cooperation through the mechanism of social scrutiny. Social scrutiny is an effective means of reducing individualism and enhancing prosocial behavior. Religion’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Implications of a Culturally Evolved Self for Notions of Free Will.Lloyd Hawkeye Robertson - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The limits of cognitive theory in anthropology.Mark Risjord - 2004 - Philosophical Explorations 7 (3):281 – 297.
    The cognitive revolution in psychology was a significant advance in our thinking about the mind. Philosophers and social scientists have looked to the cognitive sciences with the hope that the social world will yield to similar explanatory strategies. Dan Sperber has argued for a programme that would conceptualize the entire domain of anthropological theory in cognitive terms. Sperber's 'epidemiology' specifically excludes interpretive, structuralist and functionalist theories. This essay evaluates Sperber's epidemiological approach to anthropological theory. It argues that as a programme (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution.Peter Richerson - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):119-137.
    Recent debates about memetics have revealed some widespread misunderstandings about Darwinian approaches to cultural evolution. Drawing from these debates, this paper disputes five common claims: (1) mental representations are rarely discrete, and therefore models that assume discrete, gene-like particles (i.e., replicators) are useless; (2) replicators are necessary for cumulative, adaptive evolution; (3) content-dependent psychological biases are the only important processes that affect the spread of cultural representations; (4) the “cultural fitness” of a mental representation can be inferred from its successful (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  • Gods, Genes, and Passions.Ilkka Pyysiäinen - 2003 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 3 (2):175-185.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Intuitive and Explicit in Religious Thought.Ilkka Pyysiäinen - 2004 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 4 (1):123-150.
    It has been argued within the new cognitive science of religion that people's actual religious concepts and inferences differ from their explicitly held religious concepts and beliefs; the latter are too complex to be used in fast online reasoning. Natural intuitions thus tend to overwrite theological doctrine and to drive behavior. The cognitive science of religion has focused on this intuitive aspect of religion, ignoring theological thought. Here I try to outline a theoretical model on the basis of which it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • What Does God Know? Supernatural Agents' Access to Socially Strategic and Non-Strategic Information.Benjamin G. Purzycki, Daniel N. Finkel, John Shaver, Nathan Wales, Adam B. Cohen & Richard Sosis - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):846-869.
    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents’ socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents’ knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we measured response-times (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • The Role of Encoding Strategy in the Memory for Expectation-Violating Concepts.Michaela Porubanova - 2019 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 19 (3-4):305-321.
    Minimal counterintuitiveness and its automatic processing has been suggested as the explanation of persistence and transmission of cultural ideas. This purported automatic processing remains relatively unexplored. We manipulated encoding strategy to assess the persistence of memory for different types of expectation violation. Participants viewed concepts including two types of expectation violation or no violation under three different encoding conditions: in the shallow condition participants focused on the perceptual attributes of the concepts, a deep condition probed their semantic meaning, and intentional (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Acquisition of Religious Belief and the Attribution of Delusion.José Eduardo Porcher - 2018 - Filosofia Unisinos 19 (3).
    My aim in this paper is to consider the question ‘Why is belief in God not a delusion?’. In the first half of the paper, I distinguish two kinds of religious belief: institutional and personal religious belief. I then review how cognitive science accounts for cultural processes in the acquisition and transmission of institutional religious beliefs. In the second half of the paper, I present the clinical definition of delusion and underline the fact that it exempts cultural beliefs from clinical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Playing for God’s Team: The Influence of Belief in the Supernatural on Perceptions of Religious, Spiritual, and Natural Cues.Virginia A. Periss & David F. Bjorklund - 2016 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 16 (3-4):215-244.
    Adherence to religious belief may serve to promote group cohesion and cooperation by decreasing the costs associated with social exchange. Consistent with this, organized religious ideologies, unlike secular or spiritual based ideologies, have been argued to facilitate cooperation among individuals living in large-scale societies. In the current study, we examined whether hypothetical adults’ explanations of natural events focused on religious ideologies were more effective at eliciting positive-affect compared to spiritual or natural explanations. Results revealed that religious cues were more effective (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Desinformação, negacionismo e a pandemia.Ernesto Perini-Santos - 2022 - Filosofia Unisinos 23 (1):1-15.
    Para qualquer tema sobre o qual não se é especialista, deve-se deferir a quem sabe mais. A deferência aos outros entra em conflito com expectativas de autonomia epistêmica e de divisão democrática do saber. Uma solução para esta tensão é ceder a estas expectativas, o que é equivalente a abandonar o conhecimento. Uma outra solução consiste em restringir seus efeitos a temas sobre os quais temos algum interesse prático. Esta proposta é instável, porque o interesse prático pode se estender a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Exploring the Folk Understanding of Belief: Identifying Key Dimensions Endorsed in the General Population.Rachel Pechey & Peter W. Halligan - 2012 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 12 (1-2):81-99.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Tras las huellas de lo sagrado: un repaso crítico por las propuestas darwinistas para explicar la conducta religiosa.Álvaro Gómez Peña - 2017 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 22:203-220.
    In the present study a historiographical review is performed according to the main hypotheses have been proposed from a Darwinian point of view to analyse religion. First, the basic pillars of Darwinian theory are analysed: variation, inheritance and selection. Keeping in mind these previous ideas, Darwinists theorists have analysed the religion well as neutral phenomenon while exaptation, as a non-adaptive phenomenon from a memetic perspective while anachronism and as an adaptive phenomenon from a single and multilevel standpoint. Finally, a critical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Learning that there is life after death.L. Harris Paul & Astuti Rita - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):475-476.
    Bering's argument that human beings are endowed with a cognitive system dedicated to forming illusory representations of psychological immortality relies on the claim that children's beliefs in the afterlife are not the result of religious teaching. We suggest four reasons why this claim is unsatisfactory.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Why the cognitive science of religion cannot rescue ‘spiritual care’.John Paley - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (4):213-225.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Totemism, metaphor and tradition: Incorporating cultural traditions into evolutionary psychology explanations of religion.Craig T. Palmer, Lyle B. Steadman, Chris Cassidy & Kathryn Coe - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):719-735.
    Totemism, a topic that fascinated and then was summarily dismissed by anthropologists, has been resurrected by evolutionary psychologists' recent attempts to explain religion. New approaches to religion are all based on the assumption that religious behavior is the result of evolved psychological mechanisms. We focus on two aspects of Totemism that may present challenges to this view. First, if religious behavior is simply the result of evolved psychological mechanisms, would it not spring forth anew each generation from an individual's psychological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The importance of magic to social relationships.Craig T. Palmer, Lyle B. Steadman, Chris Cassidy & Kathryn Coe - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):317-337.
    Many anthropological explanations of magical practices are based on the assumption that the immediate cause of performing an act of magic is the belief that the magic will work as claimed. Such explanations typically attempt to show why people come to believe that magical acts work as claimed when such acts do not identifiably have such effects. We suggest an alternative approach to the explanation of magic that views magic as a form of religious behavior, a form of communication that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Spirituality and nursing: A reductionist approach.M. A. Paley - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):3–18.
  • Relativism and the Ontological Turn within Anthropology.Martin Paleček & Mark Risjord - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (1):3-23.
    The “ontological turn” is a recent movement within cultural anthropology. Its proponents want to move beyond a representationalist framework, where cultures are treated as systems of belief that provide different perspectives on a single world. Authors who write in this vein move from talk of many cultures to many “worlds,” thus appearing to affirm a form of relativism. We argue that, unlike earlier forms of relativism, the ontological turn in anthropology is not only immune to the arguments of Donald Davidson’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Modularity of Mind: Is It Time to Abandon This Ship?Martin Palecek - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (2):132-144.
    This article evaluates the idea of the modularity of mind and domain specificity. This concept has penetrated the behavioral disciplines, and in the case of some of these—for example, the cognitive study of religion—has even formed their foundation. Although the theoretical debate relating to the idea of modularity is ongoing, this debate has not been reflected in the use of modularity in behavioral research. The idea of domain specificity or modularity of mind is not without its controversies, and there is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Meaning and Religion: Exploring Mutual Implications.Lluis Oviedo - 2019 - Scientia et Fides 7 (1):25-46.
    “Meaning” and “religion” appear as deeply interlinked concepts in modern thought. Theology has often discovered religious faith as a “source of meaning” against a background of “meaninglessness”, as the XX century existentialist philosophies would remark. Beyond such an apologetic stance, some philosophies of religion have tried to better describe such a link: hermeneutics, phenomenology and even systems theory, may be accounted as main attempts to tackle this very complex framework, and to show how religion provides meaning, or is built trough (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Counter-Intuitive Religious Representations from the Perspective of Early Intersubjective Development and Complex Representational Constellations. A Methodological Reflection.Peter Nynäs - 2008 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1):37-55.
    My main concern in this article is the relevance of theoretically integrative approaches. I argue that such approaches are methodologically better equipped for the psychology of religion because they correspond with the inherent complexity of religiosity. In order to concretize this matter I critically evaluate the hypothesis proposed by some cognitive researchers that the attraction of counter-intuitive representations provides an explanation of religion. Irrelevant aspects are left out in this hypothesis. In contrast to this I rely on cognitive-analytic perspectives that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation