Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Psychedelics, Meditation, and Self-Consciousness.Raphaël Millière, Robin L. Carhart-Harris, Leor Roseman, Fynn-Mathis Trautwein & Aviva Berkovich-Ohana - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    In recent years, the scientific study of meditation and psychedelic drugs has seen remarkable developments. The increased focus on meditation in cognitive neuroscience has led to a cross-cultural classification of standard meditation styles validated by functional and structural neuroanatomical data. Meanwhile, the renaissance of psychedelic research has shed light on the neurophysiology of altered states of consciousness induced by classical psychedelics, such as psilocybin and LSD, whose effects are mainly mediated by agonism of serotonin receptors. Few attempts have been made (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Meditation and the Scope of Mental Action.Michael Brent & Candace Upton - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):52-71.
    While philosophers of mind have devoted abundant time and attention to questions of content and consciousness, philosophical questions about the nature and scope of mental action have been relatively neglected. Galen Strawson’s account of mental action, arguably the most well-known extant account, holds that cognitive mental action consists in triggering the delivery of content to one’s field of consciousness. However, Strawson fails to recognize several distinct types of mental action that might not reduce to triggering content delivery. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Knowing Ourselves Together: The Cultural Origins of Metacognition.Cecilia Heyes, Dan Bang, Nicholas Shea, Christopher D. Frith & Stephen M. Fleming - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (5):349-362.
    Metacognition–the ability to represent, monitor and control ongoing cognitive processes–helps us perform many tasks, both when acting alone and when working with others. While metacognition is adaptive, and found in other animals, we should not assume that all human forms of metacognition are gene-based adaptations. Instead, some forms may have a social origin, including the discrimination, interpretation, and broadcasting of metacognitive representations. There is evidence that each of these abilities depends on cultural learning and therefore that cultural selection might shape (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Inter-Individual Variability in Metacognitive Ability for Visuomotor Performance and Underlying Brain Structures.Indrit Sinanaj, Yann Cojan & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:327-337.