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The Senses and the Intellect

D. Appleton and Company (1855)

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  1. The Alternative: A Study in Psychology.Edmund R. Clay - 1882 - London: Macmillan & Co.
    The Author of "The Alternative" is indebted to Mr. Henry Sidgwick for the following opinion of the work communicated in a letter to the Editor: "I have had an unexpected interim of enforced cessation from my work, which I have employed in reading about half the proof-sheets you sent me. Without reading any more - which for the present I have not time to do - I feel no doubt that the book deserves the attention of all students of philosophy, (...)
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  • Peirce on the Passions: The Role of Instinct, Emotion, and Sentiment in Inquiry and Action.Robert J. Beeson - unknown
    One of the least explored areas of C.S. Peirce's wide range of work is his contributions to psychology and the philosophy of mind. This dissertation examines the corpus of this work, especially as it relates to the subjects of mind, habit, instinct, sentiment, emotion, perception, consciousness, cognition, and community. The argument is that Peirce's contributions to these areas of investigation were both highly original and heavily influenced by the main intellectual currents of his time. An effort has been made to (...)
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  • Perception in Philosophy and Psychology in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press. pp. 100–117.
    The chapter begins with a sketch of the empirical, theoretical, and philosophical background to nineteenth-century theories of perception, focusing on visual perception. It then considers German sensory physiology and psychology in the nineteenth century and its reception. This section gives special attention to: assumptions about nerve–sensation relations; spatial perception; the question of whether there is a two-dimensional representation in visual experience; psychophysics; size constancy; and theories of colour perception. The chapter then offers a brief look at the interaction between perceptual (...)
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  • The Emergence of Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 324–4.
    This chapter challenges the view that psychology emerged from philosophy about 1900, when each found its own proper sphere with little relation to the other. It begins by considering the notion of a discipline, defined as a distinct branch of learning. Psychology has been a discipline from the time of Aristotle, though with a wider ambit, to include phenomena of both life and mind. Empirical psychology in a narrower sense arose in the eighteenth century, through the application (in Britain and (...)
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  • How Confident Can We Be in Reconstructions of the Past?George A. Wells - 2013 - Think 12 (33):17-23.
    When I purchased Verdict on Jesus: A New Statement of Evidence, published by SPCK in 2010, I hoped it would confront me with the very latest attempt to vindicate Christian doctrines. In fact the book turns out to be fundamentally a reissue of a very conservative apologetic work of that title, first published sixty years earlier by an Anglican – Leslie Badham, who later became Vicar of Windsor and chaplain to the Queen. Admittedly, he updated the book in 1971, and (...)
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  • How Adaptive Behavior is Produced: A Perceptual-Motivational Alternative to Response Reinforcements.Dalbir Bindra - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):41-52.
  • Task-Dependent Intensity/Duration Effects in Mental Chronometry.Gerald S. Wasserman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):290-302.
  • Can the CNS Resolve a Delta Function?Stephen Yeandle - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):289-289.
  • Analysis Signatures Depend Both Upon the Analysis Used and the Data Analyzed.James L. Zacks - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):289-290.
  • Supersummation and Afterimages.Myron L. Wolbarsht - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):289-289.
  • Photoreceptor Response Parameters: What is a Criterion?R. A. Weale - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):288-289.
  • From Neurophysiology to Perception.Richard M. Warren - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):288-288.
  • On Taxonomies of Neural Coding.Brian A. Wandell - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):287-288.
  • Do Central Nonlinearities Exist?William R. Uttal - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):286-286.
  • On Peripheral and Central Explanations of Temporal Summation.Dora Fix Ventura - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):286-287.
  • Is the Temporal Summation Function a Tool for Analyzing Mechanisms of Visual Behavior?Takehiro Ueno - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):285-286.
  • Difficulties in Defining “Mental” in Mental Chronometry.Michel Treisman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):284-285.
  • Hard Times for Mental Activities.David A. Taylor - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):283-284.
  • Modeling Physiological-Behavioral Correlations.James T. Townsend - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):284-284.
  • Sensory Variables and Stages of Human Information Processing.Saul Sternberg - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):282-283.
  • Is Absolute Time Relatively Interesting?Robert J. Sternberg - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):281-282.
  • Critical Duration, Supersummation, and the Narrow Domain of Strength-Duration Experiments.George Sperling - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):279-281.
  • On Bloch's Law and “Ideal Observers.”.David H. Raab - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):278-278.
  • Relative Timing of Sensory Transduction.Adam V. Reed - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):278-279.
  • Do Mental Events Have Durations?Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):277-278.
  • Some Possible Limitations of the Temporal Summation Tool.A. Penchev, A. Kurtev & A. Vassilev - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):276-276.
  • Comparing Chronometrie Methods.Michael I. Posner - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):276-276.
  • A Neuromuscular Circuit Model of Mental Activities.F. J. McGuigan - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):274-276.
  • A Simple Analyser for Nerve-Impulse Trains.F. H. C. Marriott - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):272-273.
  • The Role of Storage and Processing Time in Temporal-Summation Phenomena.Dominic W. Massaro - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):273-274.
  • Cellular Analysis of Behavior and Cognition.R. J. W. Mansfield - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):272-272.
  • Invariance, Richness, Recoding.Lawrence E. Marks - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):272-272.
  • An Alternative Perspective on Mental Activity: Fourier Filtering.P. G. Lillywhite - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):271-271.
  • A Critique of Critical Duration Experiments.J. Z. Levinson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):269-270.
  • Can a Theory Based on Some Cell Properties Define the Timing of Mental Activities?B. Libet - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):270-271.
  • The Correlation of Peripheral Performance with Visual Behavior.Simon Laughlin - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):268-268.
  • What Are the Links Between Neural Activity and Mental Processes?K. N. Leibovic - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):268-269.
  • What Have We Learned About Mental Activities From Temporal Summation?J. J. Kulikowski - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):268-268.
  • Mechanisms That Produce Critical Durations.Daniel Kahneman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):265-266.
  • How Many Characteristics of Temporal Summation?Mitchell L. Kietzman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):266-268.
  • Adaptation Time Constants and on-Off Waveform in Neural Summation.M. Järvilehto - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):264-265.
  • Temporal Summation in Frogs and Men.Thomas E. Frumkes - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):261-263.
  • Are We Ready to Bootstrap Neurophysiology Into an Understanding of Perception?Ralph Norman Haber - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):263-264.
  • Temporal Summation in the Auditory System.L. L. Feth - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):260-261.
  • Processes and Strategies in Mental Chronometry.Emanuel Donchin - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):259-260.
  • Critical Duration and Visibility Persistence.Max Coltheart - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):258-259.
  • Events and Processes in Neural Stimulus Coding: Some Limitations and an Applicaton to Metacontrast.Bruce Bridgeman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):257-258.
  • Deviations From Intensity-Duration Reciprocity as Possible Indicators of Pathology.Harvey Babkoff - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):255-257.
  • Psychology Old and New.Gary Hatfield - 2003 - In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Cambridge History of Philosophy, 1870–1945. Cambridge University Press. pp. 93–106.
    During the period 1870-1914 the existing discipline of psychology was transformed. British thinkers including Spencer, Lewes, and Romanes allied psychology with biology and viewed mind as a function of the organism for adapting to the environment. British and German thinkers called attention to social and cultural factors in the development of individual human minds. In Germany and the United States a tradition of psychology as a laboratory science soon developed, which was called a 'new psychology' by contrast with the old, (...)
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