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  1. Teaching and Learning: Epistemic, Metaphysical and Ethical Dimensions—Introduction.David Bakhurst - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (2):255-267.
  • Minds, Brains and Education.David Bakhurst - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):415-432.
    It is often argued that neuroscience can be expected to provide insights of significance for education. Advocates of this view are sometimes committed to 'brainism', the view (a) that an individual's mental life is constituted by states, events and processes in her brain, and (b) that psychological attributes may legitimately be ascribed to the brain. This paper considers the case for rejecting brainism in favour of 'personalism', the view that psychological attributes are appropriately ascribed only to persons and that mental (...)
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  • Nature in Our Experience: Bonnett, McDowell and the Possibility of a Philosophical Study of Human Nature.Koichiro Misawa - 2020 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (2):135-150.
    Michael Bonnett has long attempted to rehabilitate the concept of nature, thereby challenging us to reconsider its profound implications for diverse educational issues. Castigating both ‘postmodern’ and ‘scientistic’ accounts of nature for failing to appreciate that nature is at once transcendent and normative, Bonnett proposes his phenomenology-inspired view of nature as the ‘self-arising’, which is bound up with the notion of ‘our experience of nature’. Despite its enormous strengths, however, Bonnett’s argument might obscure the ways in which the real issue (...)
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  • Nature, Nurture, Second Nature: Broadening the Horizons of the Philosophy of Education.Koichiro Misawa - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (5):1-13.
    The central thesis of this article is that the notion of second nature that John McDowell has reanimated has something of ethical and educational importance, thereby possibly extending the borders of the philosophy of education. The argument to this conclusion is the subject of serious consideration and criticism. The aim of this article is therefore to clarify the educational implications of the conception of second nature by responding to the three likely objections: the charge of idealism, the charge of anthropocentrism, (...)
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  • Il’enkov’s Hegel.David Bakhurst - 2013 - Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):271-285.
    This paper examines Hegel’s place in the philosophy of Eval’d Il’enkov. Hegel’s ideas had a huge impact on Il’enkov’s conception of the nature of philosophy and of the philosopher’s mission, and they formed the core of his distinctive account of thought and its place in nature. At the same time, Il’enkov was victimized for his “Hegelianism” throughout his career, from the time he was sacked from Moscow State University in 1955 to the ideological criticisms that preceded his death in 1979. (...)
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  • Minds, Brains and Education.David Bakhurst - 2008 - Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):415-432.
    It is often argued that neuroscience can be expected to provide insights of significance for education. Advocates of this view are sometimes committed to ‘brainism’, the view that an individual's mental life is constituted by states, events and processes in her brain, and that psychological attributes may legitimately be ascribed to the brain. This paper considers the case for rejecting brainism in favour of ‘personalism’, the view that psychological attributes are appropriately ascribed only to persons and that mental phenomena do (...)
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  • Technology-Enhanced Learning: A Question of Knowledge.Jan Derry - 2008 - Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):505-519.
    This paper is concerned with the human dimension of technology-enhanced learning; many suppositions are made about this but the amount of attention it has been given relative to that paid to technology is quite limited. It is argued that an aspect of the question that deserves more attention than it has received in the work on the application of technologies to education is epistemology on the grounds that the nature of knowledge and the general character of mind are critically important. (...)
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  • Technology-Enhanced Learning: A Question of Knowledge.Jan Derry - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):505-519.
    This paper is concerned with the human dimension of technology-enhanced learning; many suppositions are made about this but the amount of attention it has been given relative to that paid to technology is quite limited. It is argued that an aspect of the question that deserves more attention than it has received in the work on the application of technologies to education is epistemology on the grounds that the nature of knowledge and the general character of mind are critically important. (...)
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