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Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society.

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  1.  17
    Saving and Ignoring Lives: Physicians' Obligations to Address Root Social Influences on Health—Moral Justifications and Educational Implications.John R. Stone - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):497-509.
    The predominant influences on health are social or upstream factors. Poverty, inadequate education, insecure and toxic environments, and inferior opportunities for jobs and positions are inequitable disadvantages that adversely affect health across the globe. Many causal pathways are yet to be understood. However, elimination of these social inequalities is a moral imperative of the first order. Some physicians by word and deed argue that medical doctors should oppose the “structural violence” of social inequalities that greatly shorten lives and wreak so (...)
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  2.  34
    Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat.Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that (...)
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  3.  47
    Confidentiality in Professional Medical Ethics.Robert Baker - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):39 – 41.
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  4.  56
    From Rivalry to Rapproachement: Biomedicine, Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) at Ethical Crossroads. [REVIEW]Chidi Oguamanam - 2006 - HEC Forum 18 (3):245-264.
    Against the backdrop of the political intrigue in biomedicine’s ascendancy to orthodoxy, this article examines its contemporary rapprochement with Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM), in the move toward an integrated medical regime. It also identifies and explores factors underlying the rapprochement, as well as different ethical challenges that face integrated medicine. It argues that a major approach to tackling these challenges hinges on devising just and equitable criteria for evaluating the efficacy of plural therapeutic paradigms inherent in CAM models. This is (...)
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    A Draft Model Aggregated Code of Ethics for Bioethicists.Robert Baker - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):33 – 41.
    Bioethicists function in an environment in which their peers - healthcare executives, lawyers, nurses, physicians - assert the integrity of their fields through codes of professional ethics. Is it time for bioethics to assert its integrity by developing a code of ethics? Answering in the affirmative, this paper lays out a case by reviewing the historical nature and function of professional codes of ethics. Arguing that professional codes are aggregative enterprises growing in response to a field's historical experiences, it asserts (...)
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    A Code of Ethics for Bioethicists: Prospects and Problems.Jessica Miller - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):66-68.
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    Oversimplifications I: Physicians Don't Do Public Health.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):4 – 5.
    *The views in this article are the author's alone and should not be construed as policy statements of the American Medical Association.
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    The One-Sided Obligations of Journalism.Michael Davis - 2004 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3-4):207-222.
    Barger and Barney (2004/this issue) offered a number of reasons for the public, the news media, and journalism to develop special, mutually supportive standards of conduct. However, they imbedded these reasonable suggestions in an argument that claims far more than can be delivered. In explaining what is wrong with their argument, I place journalistic ethics within a general theory of professional ethics.
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    Clinical Ethics Teaching in Britain: A History of the London Medical Group.Michael Whong-Barr - 2003 - New Review of Bioethics 1 (1):73-84.
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