Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Beyond Interactionism: A Transactional Approach to Behavioral Development.David B. Miller - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):641-642.
  • Are Species Intelligent? Look for Genetic Knowledge Structures.J. David Smith - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):89-90.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Evolution, Development, and Learning in Cognitive Science.David Leiser - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):80-81.
  • Aristotle, Chimpanzees and Other Political Animals.Larry Arnhart - 1990 - Social Science Information 29 (3):477-557.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Brains, Genes, and Language Evolution: A New Synthesis.Morten H. Christiansen & Nick Chater - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):537-558.
    Our target article argued that a genetically specified Universal Grammar (UG), capturing arbitrary properties of languages, is not tenable on evolutionary grounds, and that the close fit between language and language learners arises because language is shaped by the brain, rather than the reverse. Few commentaries defend a genetically specified UG. Some commentators argue that we underestimate the importance of processes of cultural transmission; some propose additional cognitive and brain mechanisms that may constrain language and perhaps differentiate humans from nonhuman (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Culture in Whales and Dolphins.Luke Rendell & Hal Whitehead - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):309-324.
    Studies of animal culture have not normally included a consideration of cetaceans. However, with several long-term field studies now maturing, this situation should change. Animal culture is generally studied by either investigating transmission mechanisms experimentally, or observing patterns of behavioural variation in wild populations that cannot be explained by either genetic or environmental factors. Taking this second, ethnographic, approach, there is good evidence for cultural transmission in several cetacean species. However, only the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops) has been shown experimentally to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Developmental Explanation and the Ontogeny of Birdsong: Nature/Nurture Redux.Timothy Johnston - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):617-630.
    Despite several decades of criticism, dichotomous thinking about behavioral development remains widespread and influential. This is particularly true in study of birdsong development, where it has become increasingly common to diagnose songs, elements of songs, or precursors of songs as either innate or learned on the basis of isolation-rearing experiments. The theory of sensory templates has encouraged both the dichotomous approach and an emphasis on structural rather than functional aspects of song development. As a result, potentially important lines of investigation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  • Evidence for Teaching in an Australian Songbird.Hollis Taylor - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Song in oscine birds relies upon the rare capacity of vocal learning. Transmission can be vertical, horizontal, or oblique. As a rule, memorization and production by a naïve bird are not simultaneous: the long-term storage of song phrases precedes their first vocal rehearsal by months. While a wealth of detail regarding songbird enculturation has been uncovered by focusing on the apprentice, whether observational learning can fully account for the ontogeny of birdsong, or whether there could also be an element of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cultural Transmission, Evolution, and Revolution in Vocal Displays: Insights From Bird and Whale Song.Ellen C. Garland & Peter K. McGregor - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Are Species Intelligent?: Not a Yes or No Question.Jonathan Schull - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):94-108.
    Plant and animal species are information-processing entities of such complexity, integration, and adaptive competence that it may be scientifically fruitful to consider them intelligent. The possibility arises from the analogy between learning and evolution, and from recent developments in evolutionary science, psychology and cognitive science. Species are now described as spatiotemporally localized individuals in an expanded hierarchy of biological entities. Intentional and cognitive abilities are now ascribed to animal, human, and artificial intelligence systems that process information adaptively, and that manifest (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Singing Down a Blind Alley.John Alcock - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):630-631.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • In Search of a Unified Theory of Sensory Perception: Possible Links between the Vibrational Mechanism of Olfaction and the Evolution of Language.Amelia Lewis - 2020 - Biosemiotics 13 (2):261-270.
    Here, I outline the idea of a unified hypothesis of sensory perception, developed from the theoretical vibrational mechanism of olfaction, which can be applied across all sensory modalities. I propose that all sensory perception is based upon the detection of mechanical forces at a cellular level, and the subsequent mechanotransduction of the signal via the nervous system. Thus, I argue that the sensory modalities found in the animal kingdom may all be viewed as being mechanoreceptory, rather than being discrete neurophysiological (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Are Species Intelligent?: Not a Yes or No Question.Jonathan Schull - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):63-75.
    Plant and animal species are information-processing entities of such complexity, integration, and adaptive competence that it may be scientifically fruitful to consider them intelligent. The possibility arises from the analogy between learning and evolution, and from recent developments in evolutionary science, psychology and cognitive science. Species are now described as spatiotemporally localized individuals in an expanded hierarchy of biological entities. Intentional and cognitive abilities are now ascribed to animal, human, and artificial intelligence systems that process information adaptively, and that manifest (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Biotic Intelligence (BI)?F. J. Odling-Smee - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):83-84.
  • Song Development From Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives.William A. Searcy - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):647-648.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Song Learning and Dialect: More Experiments Needed.Myron Charles Baker & Michael A. Cunningham - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):757-758.
  • Sensitive Periods, Social Interaction, and Song Acquisition: The Dialectics of Dialects?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):756-757.
  • Why Would We Ever Doubt That Species Are Intelligent?Nicholas S. Thompson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):94-94.
  • Effective Search Using Sewall Wright's Shifting Balance Hypothesis.B. H. Sumida - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):93-93.
  • Neo-Lamarckism, or, The Rediscovery of Culture.Gary W. Strong - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):92-93.
  • Learning, Selection, and Species.Kim Sterelny - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):90-91.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Of Cockroaches as Kings.Robert J. Sternberg - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):91-91.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Misplaced Predicates and Misconstrued Intelligence.Stanley N. Salthe - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):86-87.
  • Natural Teleology and Species Intelligence.Albert Silverstein - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):87-89.
  • “Intelligence” as Description and as Explanation.P. A. Russell - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):86-86.
  • Which Came First, the Egg-Problem or the Hen-Solution?Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):84-86.
  • “Intelligent” Evolution and Neo-Darwinian Straw Men.Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):81-82.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Way of All Matter.William A. MacKay - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):82-83.
  • Species Intelligence: Analogy Without Homology.James W. Kalat - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):80-80.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Species Intelligence: Hazards of Structural Parallels.Robert W. Hendersen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):78-79.
  • Similarities and Dissimilarities Between Adaptation and Learning.Mark H. Johnson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):79-80.
  • Are Libraries Intelligent?Michael T. Ghiselin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):78-78.
  • Unfortunately, Scale and Time Matter.Kim C. Derrickson & Russell S. Greenberg - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):77-78.
  • Are Species Gaia's Thoughts?V. Csányi - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):76-76.
  • Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks.Daniel C. Dennett - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):76-77.
  • The Ontology of “Intelligent Species”.Philip Clayton - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):75-76.
  • Challenges to an Interactionist Approach to the Study of Song Development.Timothy D. Johnston - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):651-663.
  • Interactionism is Good, but Not Good Enough.Esther Thelen - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):650-650.
  • The Nature/Nurture Debate: Same Old Wolf in New Sheep's Clothing?Horst D. Steklis - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):649-650.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Nature and Nurture of Birdsong.P. J. B. Slater - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):648-649.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In Defense of Innateness and of its Critics.Jonathan Schull - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):646-647.
  • Nature/Nurture Reflux.Irene M. Pepperberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):645-646.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Do You Transmit a Template?Susan Oyama - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):644-645.
  • Conceptual Errors, Different Perspectives, and Genetic Analysis of Song Ontogeny.Paul C. Mundinger - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):643-644.
  • ‘Innate’: Outdated and Inadequate or Linguistic Convenience?Eugene S. Morton - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):642-643.
  • Birdsong Development: Real or Imagined Results?R. E. Lemon - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):640-641.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Song Development and Sexual Imprinting: Toward an Interactionist Approach.Jaap P. Kruijt & Carel ten Cate - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):640-640.
  • Behavioral Ontogeny Research: No Pain, No Gain?Donald E. Kroodsma - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):639-640.
  • When is Developmental Biology Not Developmental Biology?Ronald Konopka - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):639-639.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ducks Don't Sing.Andrew P. King & Meredith J. West - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):638-639.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark