Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Cognition Does Not Affect Perception: Evaluating the Evidence for “Top-Down” Effects.Chaz Firestone & Brian J. Scholl - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-72.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  • The Integrity of Motivated Vision: A Reply to Gilchrist, 2020.Kent Harber, Jeanine Stefanucci & Dustin Stokes - forthcoming - Perception.
    In the September 2020 edition of Perception, Alan Gilchrist published an editorial entitled “The Integrity of Vision” (Gilchrist, 2020). In it, Gilchrist critiques motivated perception research. His main points are as follows: (1) Motivated perception is compromised by experimental demand: Results do not actually show motivated perception but instead reflect subjects’ desires to comply with inferred predictions. (2) Motivated perception studies use designs that make predictions obvious to subjects. These transparent designs conspire with experimental demand to yield confirmatory but compromised (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Emotion, Goals, and Distance: A View From the Study of Adult Development and Aging.Derek M. Isaacowitz & Alexandra M. Freund - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):132-133.
    In this commentary, we consider how Balcetis’s proposals may interface with the study of motivation and emotion in lifespan developmental psychology, pointing to open questions regarding the distance perception of long-term chronic goals as well as age-related shifts from informational to emotional goals.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Commentary on Balcetis: On Some Limits to the Motivational Direction Approach.Jeanine K. Stefanucci & Dustin Stokes - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):129-130.
    While we are sympathetic to Balcetis’s approach, we feel that using motivational direction as the sole organizing structure for influences of affect on perception may be unnecessarily limiting. Three reasons for this concern are discussed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Paradox of Parsimony in Motivated Distance Perception.Justin Storbeck - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):130-132.
    The motivated distance perception theory paradoxically is too parsimonious to account for a variety of findings, including those of the author. The theory poorly defines the features of eliciting situations, which fails to constrain the theory making it nonfalsifiable and allows for post hoc interpretation of the effects. Finally, the theory ignores the complexity of the motivational system and the automaticity of motivations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Enactive Pragmatism and Ecological Psychology.Matthew Crippen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    A widely cited roadblock to bridging ecological psychology and enactivism is that the former identifies with realism and the latter identifies with constructivism, which critics charge is subjectivist. A pragmatic reading, however, suggests non-mental forms of constructivism that simultaneously fit core tenets of enactivism and ecological realism. After advancing a pragmatic version of enactive constructivism that does not obviate realism, I reinforce the position with an empirical illustration: Physarum polycephalum, a communal unicellular organism that leaves slime trails that form chemical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Influence of Human Body Orientation on Distance Judgments.Edgard Jung, Kohske Takahashi, Katsumi Watanabe, Stephan de la Rosa, Martin V. Butz, Heinrich H. Bülthoff & Tobias Meilinger - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Empirical Perspectives on the Cognitive Penetrability of Perception.Piotr Litwin - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (1):159-182.
    The problem of the cognitive penetrability of perception pertains to whether perceptual processing may be impacted by higher-order cognitive processes. It may be understood in a twofold sense: 1) whether what a perceptual system computes may be altered in a way that is semantically coherent to one’s cognitive states; 2) whether perceptual experience may be influenced by cognitive processes. It has been argued that the cognitive penetrability problem is not scientifically tractable since we have no direct access to other persons’ (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark