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  1. Generation and the Unity of Form in Aristotle.Beverly Hinton - 2006 - Apeiron 39 (4):359 - 380.
  • Form, Substance, and Mechanism.Robert Pasnau - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (1):31-88.
    Philosophers today have largely given up on the project of categorizing being. Aristotle’s ten categories now strike us as quaint, and no attempt to improve on that effort meets with much interest. Still, no one supposes that reality is smoothly distributed over space. The world at large comes in chunks, and there remains a widespread intuition, even among philosophers, that some of these chunks have a special sort of unity and persistence. These, we tend to suppose, are most truly agents (...)
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  • Evolutionary Essentialism.Denis Walsh - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):425-448.
    According to Aristotelian essentialism, the nature of an organism is constituted of a particular goal-directed disposition to produce an organism typical of its kind. This paper argues—against the prevailing orthodoxy—that essentialism of this sort is indispensable to evolutionary biology. The most powerful anti-essentialist arguments purport to show that the natures of organisms play no explanatory role in modern synthesis biology. I argue that recent evolutionary developmental biology provides compelling evidence to the contrary. Developmental biology shows that one must appeal to (...)
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  • What Are Biological Species? : The Impact of the Current Debate in Taxonomy on the Species Problem.Nicole Leroux - unknown
    For the past twenty years, taxonomy has been in a state of turmoil. This confusion brings along with it four distinct schools of thought, each of which offers a different concept of biological species. The thesis will show that these concepts are purely operational and have only a weak theoretical force. In turn, it will be argued that a sound definition of species uses the notion of natural kinds, which is itself defined in term of non-causal nomological regularities.
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  • Partikularitet Og Universalitet I Aristoteles' Formlære- Skitse Af En Position.Morten Hansen - 2004 - Res Cogitans 1 (1).
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  • Aristotle on the Mechanisms of Inheritance.Devin Henry - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):425-455.
    In this paper I address an important question in Aristotle’s biology, What are the causal mechanisms behind the transmission of biological form? Aristotle’s answer to this question, I argue, is found in Generation of Animals Book 4 in connection with his investigation into the phenomenon of inheritance. There we are told that an organism’s reproductive material contains a set of "movements" which are derived from the various "potentials" of its nature (the internal principle of change that initiates and controls development). (...)
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  • La Génération Spontanée Et le Problème de la Reproduction des Espèces Avant Et Après Descartes.Justin E. H. Smith - 2007 - Philosophiques 34 (2):273-294.
    Dans cet article je mets en évidence quelques problèmes conceptuels importants posés par le prétendu phénomène de la génération spontanée, en montrant comment ils étaient liés historiquement à la question théorique des origines et de l’ontologie des espèces biologiques. Au XVIe et XVIIe siècle tout particulièrement, la possibilité que des formes organiques soient générées dans la matière inorganique supposait la possibilité que le hasard gouverne non seulement l’apparition d’une anguille ou d’une souris, mais qu’il gouverne l’apparition originelle de leurs espèces (...)
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  • Aristotle’s Hylomorphism: The Causal-Explanatory Model.Michail Peramatzis - 2018 - Metaphysics 1 (1):12-32.
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  • Colloquium 1: Aristotle’s Metaphysics as the Ontology of Being-Alive and its Relevance Today.Alfred Miller - 2005 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):1-107.
  • Colloquium 2.Helen Cartwright - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):64-78.
  • Pre-Theoretical Aspects of Aristotelian Definition and Classification of Animals: The Case for Common Sense.Scott Atran - 1985 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (2):113.
  • Eidos et Ousia. De l'unité théorique de la Métaphysique d'Aristote.Annick Jaulin - 1999 - Paris: Classiques Garnier.
  • Intrinsic Value of Species.Frank Glen Avantaggio - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    This is an essay about ethics and environmental responsibility. The thesis is that biologic species qua species--not only as collections of individuals or as elements of ecosystems--deserve moral regard. The argument establishes moral considerability on powers and freedoms of relative self-determination and autonomy. It is argued that species are living beings in their own right with their own projects and interests which deserve special regard. The essay draws from the arguments of Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Boethius, Avicenna, Maimonides, Leibniz, Spinoza, Kant, (...)
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  • Organismal Natures.Devin Henry - 2008 - Apeiron (3):47-74.
  • Understanding Aristotle's Reproductive Hylomorphism.Devin Henry - 2006 - Apeiron 39 (3):257 - 287.
  • Aristotle's de partibus animalium I and de generatione animalium I.James Lennox - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):817-823.
  • Consequence Etiology and Biological Teleology in Aristotle and Darwin.David J. Depew - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (4):379-390.
    Aristotle’s biological teleology is rooted in an epigenetic account of reproduction. As such, it is best interpreted by consequence etiology. I support this claim by citing the capacity of consequence etiology’s key distinctions to explain Aristotle’s opposition to Empedocles. There are implications for the relation between ancient and modern biology. The analysis reveals that in an important respect Darwin’s account of adaptation is closer to Aristotle’s than to Empedocles’s. They both rely on consequence etiological considerations to evade attributing the purposiveness (...)
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  • Origin of the Species and Genus Concepts: An Anthropological Perspective.Scott Atran - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (2):195-279.
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  • Aristotle's Physics II 1 and Cultivated Plants.Errol G. Katayama - 2018 - Science in Context 31 (4):405-419.
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  • Consequence Etiology and Biological Teleology in Aristotle and Darwin.David J. Depew - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (4):379-390.
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