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  1. Shame and the Future of Feminism.Jill Locke - 2007 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (4):146-162.
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  • Shame and the Future of Feminism.Jill Locke - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):146-162.
    Recent works have recovered the ethical and political value of shame, suggesting that if shame is felt for the right reasons, toxic forms of shame may be alleviated. Rereading Hannah Arendt's biography of the "conscious pariah," Rahel Varnhagen, Locke concludes that a politics of shame does not have the radical potential its proponents seek. Access to a public world, not shaming those who shame us, catapults the shamed pariah into the practices of democratic citizenship.
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  • Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW]Bashir Bashir - 2012 - Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of historical (...)
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  • Shame and the Future of Feminism.Jill Locke - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):146-162.
    : Recent works have recovered the ethical and political value of shame, suggesting that if shame is felt for the right reasons, toxic forms of shame may be alleviated. Rereading Hannah Arendt's biography of the "conscious pariah," Rahel Varnhagen, Locke concludes that a politics of shame does not have the radical potential its proponents seek. Access to a public world, not shaming those who shame us, catapults the shamed pariah into the practices of democratic citizenship.
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