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  1. Religious Authority and the Transmission of Abstract God Concepts.Nathan Cofnas - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (4):609-628.
    According to the Standard Model account of religion, religious concepts tend to conform to “minimally counterintuitive” schemas. Laypeople may, to varying degrees, verbally endorse the abstract doctrines taught by professional theologians. But, outside the Sunday school exam room, the implicit representations that tend to guide people’s everyday thinking, feeling, and behavior are about minimally counterintuitive entities. According to the Standard Model, these implicit representations are the essential thing to be explained by the cognitive science of religion. It is argued here (...)
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  • The Mnemonic of Intuitive Ontology Violation is Not the Distinctiveness Effect: Evidence From a Broad Age Spectrum of Persons in the UK and China During a Free-Recall Task.Justin P. Gregory & Tyler S. Greenway - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (3-4):253-280.
    The typical formulation of Pascal Boyer’s counterintuitiveness theory asserts that concepts violating intuitive ontological-category structures are more memorable. However, Boyer’s original claim centered on the transmission advantages of counter-ontological representations that were cultural. Nevertheless, subsequent studies focused on the recall of novel counterintuitive representations, and an “alternative account” of the memorability of counterintuitive concepts has emerged resembling the distinctiveness effect. Yet, experimental evidence shows that familiar concepts have memorability advantages over novel ones. This investigation of these pan-cultural transmission biases used (...)
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  • The Mnemonic of Intuitive Ontology Violation is Not the Distinctiveness Effect: Evidence From a Broad Age Spectrum of Persons in the UK and China During a Free-Recall Task.Justin P. Gregory & Tyler S. Greenway - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (1-2):169-197.
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  • Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief.Andrew Shtulman & Marjaana Lindeman - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (3):635-670.
    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains unclear which human properties we tend to attribute to God and under what conditions. In three studies, participants decided whether two types of human properties—psychological properties and physiological properties—could or could not be attributed to God. In Study 1, participants made significantly more psychological attributions than physiological attributions, and the frequency of those attributions (...)
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  • Expectancy Violations Promote Learning in Young Children.Aimee E. Stahl & Lisa Feigenson - 2017 - Cognition 163:1-14.
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  • Why the Cognitive Science of Religion Cannot Rescue ‘Spiritual Care’.John Paley - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (4):213-225.
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  • Violations of Core Knowledge Shape Early Learning.Aimee E. Stahl & Lisa Feigenson - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):136-153.
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  • A Ritual by Any Other Name.Rohan Kapitány & Christopher Kavanagh - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • What is Counterintuitive? Religious Cognition and Natural Expectation.Yvan I. Russell & Fernand Gobet - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):715-749.
    What is ‘counterintuitive’? There is general agreement that it refers to a violation of previously held knowledge, but the precise definition seems to vary with every author and study. The aim of this paper is to deconstruct the notion of ‘counterintuitive’ and provide a more philosophically rigorous definition congruent with the history of psychology, recent experimental work in ‘minimally counterintuitive’ concepts, the science vs. religion debate, and the developmental and evolutionary background of human beings. We conclude that previous definitions of (...)
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