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  1. Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering.Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at (...)
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  • Agreeing is Not Enough.Johanne Stege Bjørndahl, Riccardo Fusaroli, Svend østergaard & Kristian Tylén - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (3):495-525.
    Collaborative interaction pervades many everyday practices: work meetings, innovation and product design, education and arts. Previous studies have pointed to the central role of acknowledgement and acceptance for the success of joint action, by creating affiliation and signaling understanding. We argue that various forms of explicit miscommunication are just as critical to challenge, negotiate and integrate individual contributions in collaborative creative activities. Through qualitative microanalysis of spontaneous coordination in collective creative LEGO constructions, we individuate three interactional styles: inclusive, characterized by (...)
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  • Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales.Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at timescale (...)
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  • Incrementality and Intention-Recognition in Utterance Processing.Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Ruth Kempson, Matthew Purver, Gregory Mills, Ronnie Cann, Wilfried Meyer-Viol & Patrick G. T. Healey - 2011 - Dialogue and Discourse 2 (1):199-232.
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  • Pooling the Ground: Understanding and Coordination in Collective Sense Making.Joanna Rä…Czaszek-Leonardi, Agnieszka Dä™Bska & Adam Sochanowicz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Non-Lexical Conversational Sounds in American English.Nigel Ward - 2006 - Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):129-182.
    Sounds like h-nmm, hh-aaaah, hn-hn, unkay, nyeah, ummum, uuh, um-hm-uh-hm, um and uh-huh occur frequently in American English conversation but have thus far escaped systematic study. This article reports a study of both the forms and functions of such tokens in a corpus of American English conversations. These sounds appear not to be lexical, in that they are productively generated rather than finite in number, and in that the sound¿meaning mapping is compositional rather than arbitrary. This implies that English bears (...)
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  • Overhearers Use Addressee Backchannels in Dialog Comprehension.Jackson Tolins & Jean E. Fox Tree - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1412-1434.
    Observing others in conversation is a common format for comprehending language, yet little work has been done to understand dialog comprehension. We tested whether overhearers use addressee backchannels as predictive cues for how to integrate information across speaker turns during comprehension of spontaneously produced collaborative narration. In Experiment 1, words that followed specific backchannels were recognized more slowly than words that followed either generic backchannels or pauses. In Experiment 2, we found that when the turn after the backchannel was a (...)
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  • Language as a Tool for Interacting Minds.Kristian Tylén, Ethan Weed, Mikkel Wallentin, Andreas Roepstorff & Chris D. Frith - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (1):3-29.
    What is the role of language in social interaction? What does language bring to social encounters? We argue that language can be conceived of as a tool for interacting minds, enabling especially effective and flexible forms of social coordination, perspective-taking and joint action. In a review of evidence from a broad range of disciplines, we pursue elaborations of the language-as-a-tool metaphor, exploring four ways in which language is employed in facilitation of social interaction. We argue that language dramatically extends the (...)
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  • Should Remote Collaborators Be Represented by Avatars? A Matter of Common Ground for Collective Medical Decision-Making.J. Tapie, P. Terrier, L. Perron & J.-M. Cellier - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (3):331-350.
    In a collaborative work situation at a distance, the use of avatars to represent collaborators reduces collaborative effort. Also, animated avatars can help distant users to ground their relationship and facilitate their interaction because they materialise visual clues for the distant collaborators and their current activity. To check the validity of these hypotheses we set up an experiment based on the use of a collaborative virtual environment (CVE) synchronised for collective medical decision-making. Several teams of practitioners from different disciplines will (...)
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  • “Does Not Compute”? Music as Real-Time Communicative Interaction.Ian Cross - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (4):415-430.