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  1. The Non-Christian Influence on Anselm’s Proslogion Argument.Nancy Kendrick - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):73-89.
    This paper considers Anselm’s Proslogion argument against a background of historical events that include philosophical disputes between Christian and Jewish polemicists. I argue that the Proslogion argument was addressed, in part, to non-Christian theists and that it offered a response to Jewish polemicists who had argued that the Christian conception of God as an instantiated unity was irrational. Anselm is not trying to convince atheists that there really is a God. He is arguing that the Christian conception of God is (...)
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  • God’s Story and Bioethics: The Christian Witness to The Reconciled World.Hans G. Ulrich - 2015 - Christian Bioethics 21 (3):303-333.
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  • Exploring the Concept of Spirit as a Model for the God-World Relationship in the Age of Genetics.Lindon Eaves & Lora Gross - 1992 - Zygon 27 (3):261-285.
  • Science and Religion in the Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.Rodney D. Holder - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):115-132.
    The German theologian and martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer is not widely known for engaging with scientific thought, having been heavily influenced by Karl Barth's celebrated stance against natural theology. However, during the period of his maturing theology in prison Bonhoeffer read a significant scientific work, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker's The World View of Physics. From this he gained two major insights for his theological outlook. First, he realized that the notion of a "God of the gaps" is futile, not just in (...)
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  • Hauerwas's "With the Grain of the Universe" and the Barthian Outlook: A Few Observations.Roger Gustavsson - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):25 - 86.
    This article has two main divisions, the first consisting in parts 1-3, the second in parts 4-8. The purpose of the first division is to assess Hauerwas's contentions regarding what he takes to be serious debilities in modern theological culture. The objects of Hauerwas's criticism are: (1) natural theology; (2) reason as it is represented in the structure of the modern university and in the "Enlightenment Project"; and (3) liberal Protestantism--the latter particularly as it turns up, by his account, in (...)
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