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  1. Eliminating the Mystery From the Concept of Emergence.Brian R. Johnson - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):843-849.
    While some branches of complexity theory are advancing rapidly, the same cannot be said for our understanding of emergence. Despite a complete knowledge of the rules underlying the interactions between the parts of many systems, we are often baffled by their sudden transitions from simple to complex. Here I propose a solution to this conceptual problem. Given that emergence is often the result of many interactions occurring simultaneously in time and space, an ability to intuitively grasp it would require the (...)
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  • Strategies for Managing the Structural and Dynamic Consequences of Project Complexity.Serghei Floricel, Sorin Piperca & Richard Tee - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-17.
    We propose a theoretical framework that highlights the most important consequences of complexity for the form and evolution of projects and use it to develop a typology of project complexity. This framework also enables us to deepen the understanding of how knowledge production and flexibility strategies enable project participants to address complexity. Based on this understanding, we advance a number of propositions regarding the strategies that can be most effective for different categories of complexity. These results contribute to the integration (...)
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  • Lightning in a Bottle: Complexity, Chaos, and Computation in Climate Science.Jon Lawhead - 2014 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    Climatology is a paradigmatic complex systems science. Understanding the global climate involves tackling problems in physics, chemistry, economics, and many other disciplines. I argue that complex systems like the global climate are characterized by certain dynamical features that explain how those systems change over time. A complex system's dynamics are shaped by the interaction of many different components operating at many different temporal and spatial scales. Examining the multidisciplinary and holistic methods of climatology can help us better understand the nature (...)
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  • The Dynamics of Perception and Action.William H. Warren - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (2):358-389.
  • Complexity and Information: Measuring Emergence, Self‐Organization, and Homeostasis at Multiple Scales.Carlos Gershenson & Nelson Fernández - 2013 - Complexity 18 (2):29-44.
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  • Emergence is Coupled to Scope, Not Level.Alex J. Ryan - 2007 - Complexity 13 (2):67-77.
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  • Causal Explanation in Psychiatry.Tuomas K. Pernu - 2019 - In Şerife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  • From Big Data to Important Information.Yaneer Bar-Yam - 2016 - Complexity 21 (S2):73-98.
  • Calculating Entropy at Different Scales Among Diverse Communication Systems.Gerardo Febres & Klaus Jaffé - 2016 - Complexity 21 (S1):330-353.
  • In Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology.Shimon Edelman - unknown
    By what empirical means can a person determine whether he or she is presently awake or dreaming? Any conceivable test addressing this question, which is a special case of the classical metaphysical doubting of reality, must be statistical (for the same reason that empirical science is, as noted by Hume). Subjecting the experienced reality to any kind of statistical test (for instance, a test for bizarreness) requires, however, that a set of baseline measurements be available. In a dream, or in (...)
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  • Classification of Emergence and its Relation to Self‐Organization.Julianne D. Halley & David A. Winkler - 2008 - Complexity 13 (5):10-15.
  • Self-Organization, Emergence, and Constraint in Complex Natural Systems.Jon Lawhead - manuscript
    Contemporary complexity theory has been instrumental in providing novel rigorous definitions for some classic philosophical concepts, including emergence. In an attempt to provide an account of emergence that is consistent with complexity and dynamical systems theory, several authors have turned to the notion of constraints on state transitions. Drawing on complexity theory directly, this paper builds on those accounts, further developing the constraint-based interpretation of emergence and arguing that such accounts recover many of the features of more traditional accounts. We (...)
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  • Is More Different? Emergent Properties in Physics.Paul Mainwood - unknown
    This thesis gives a philosophical assessment of a contemporary movement, influential amongst physicists, about the status of microscopic and macroscopic properties. The fountainhead for the movement was a short 1972 paper `More is Different', written by the condensed-matter physicist, Philip Anderson. Each of the chapters is concerned with themes mentioned in that paper, or subsequently expounded by Anderson and his followers. In Chapter 1, I aim to locate Anderson's existence claims for `emergent properties' within the metaphysical, epistemological and methodological doctrines (...)
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  • The “Weight” of Models and Complexity.Jing Du - 2016 - Complexity 21 (3):21-35.
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  • Cohomological Emergence of Sense in Discourses.René Guitart - 2009 - Axiomathes 19 (3):245-270.
    As a significant extension of our previous calculus of logical differentials and moving logic, we propose here a mathematical diagram for specifying the emergence of novelty, through the construction of some “differentials” related to cohomological computations. Later we intend to examine how to use these “differentials” in the analysis of anticipation or evolution schemes. This proposal is given as a consequence of our comments on the Ehresmann–Vanbremeersch’s work on memory evolutive systems, from the two points of view which are characterization (...)
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  • Computationally Tractable Pairwise Complexity Profile.Yaneer Bar‐Yam & Dion Harmon - 2013 - Complexity 18 (5):20-27.
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  • Emergence and Adaptation.Philippe Huneman - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (4):493-520.
    I investigate the relationship between adaptation, as defined in evolutionary theory through natural selection, and the concept of emergence. I argue that there is an essential correlation between the former, and “emergence” defined in the field of algorithmic simulations. I first show that the computational concept of emergence (in terms of incompressible simulation) can be correlated with a causal criterion of emergence (in terms of the specificity of the explanation of global patterns). On this ground, I argue that emergence in (...)
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  • Emergent Phenomena Belong Only to Biology.Hugues Bersini - 2012 - Synthese 185 (2):257-272.
    In this philosophical paper, I discuss and illustrate the necessary three ingredients that together could allow a collective phenomenon to be labelled as “emergent.” First, the phenomenon, as usual, requires a group of natural objects entering in a non-linear relationship and potentially entailing the existence of various semantic descriptions depending on the human scale of observation. Second, this phenomenon has to be observed by a mechanical observer instead of a human one, which has the natural capacity for temporal or spatial (...)
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