Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Obesity, Equity and Choice.Timothy M. Wilkinson - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):323-328.
    Obesity is often considered a public health crisis in rich countries that might be alleviated by preventive regulations such as a sugar tax or limiting the density of fast food outlets. This paper evaluates these regulations from the point of view of equity. Obesity is in many countries correlated with socioeconomic status and some believe that preventive regulations would reduce inequity. The puzzle is this: how could policies that reduce the options of the badly off be more equitable? Suppose we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • I Eat, Therefore I Am: Disgust and the Intersection of Food and Identity.Daniel Kelly & Nicolae Morar - 2018 - In Tyler Doggett, Anne Barnhill & Mark Budolfson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 637 - 657.
  • Paternalistic Food and Beverage Policies: A Response to Conly.David B. Resnik - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):170-177.
    Sarah Conly defends paternalistic public health policies, such as New York City’s soft drink ban, on the grounds that they promote values that people accept but have difficulty realizing, owing to their cognitive biases. In this commentary, I criticize Conly’s defense of the soft drink ban and offer my own view of the justification for paternalistic food and beverage policies. I propose that paternalistic government restrictions on food and beverage choices should address a significant health problem pertaining to a specific (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Ending SNAP-Subsidized Purchases of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: The Need for a Pilot Project.Nicole M. V. Ross & Douglas P. MacKay - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    Recent efforts by legislative officials and public health advocates to reform the US food stamp program, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, have focused on restricting the types of foods eligible for purchase with SNAP benefits, specifically sugar-sweetened beverages. We argue that it is, in principle, permissible for the US government to enact a SNAP-specific SSB ban prohibiting the purchase of SSBs with SNAP benefits. While the government has a duty to ensure that citizens meet their nutritional needs, since SSBs provide (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Do Sugary Drinks Undermine the Core Purpose of SNAP?Anne Barnhill - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):82-88.
    Ross and MacKay argue that excluding sugar-sweetened beverages from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is ‘in principle morally permissible’ because it does not violate the central obligation that SNAP is meant to discharge—the obligation to ensure that citizens have secure access to food adequate to meet their nutritional needs. I query this argument, and suggest two other ways of understanding the core purpose of SNAP. According to the first, the core purpose of SNAP includes promoting good nutritional outcomes; thus, one (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation