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  1. Charles Darwin and the Scientific Mind.David Stack - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (1):85-115.
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  • Ethers, Religion and Politics in Late-Victorian Physics: Beyond the Wynne Thesis.Richard Noakes - 2005 - History of Science 43 (4):415-455.
  • From Practical Men to Scientific Experts: British Veterinary Surgeons and the Development of Government Scientific Expertise, C. 1878–1919. [REVIEW]Abigail Woods - 2013 - History of Science 51 (4):457-480.
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  • A Question of Merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the 'Concussion' Over the Edinburgh Chair of Botany.Richard Bellon - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):25-54.
    In 1845, Robert Graham’s death created a vacancy for the traditionally dual appointment to the University of Edinburgh’s chair of botany and the Regius Keepership of the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden. John Hutton Balfour and Joseph Hooker emerged as the leading candidates. The contest quickly became embroiled in long running controversies over the nature and control of Scottish university education at a time of particular social and political tension after a recent schism in Church of Scotland. The politics of the (...)
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  • Resister's Logic: The Anti-Vaccination Arguments of Alfred Russel Wallace and Their Role in the Debates Over Compulsory Vaccination in England, 1870–1907.Fichman Martin & E. Keelan Jennifer - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (3):585-607.
    In the 1880s, Alfred Russel Wallace, the celebrated co-discoverer of natural selection, launched himself into the centre of a politicised and polarised debate over the unpopular compulsory vaccination laws in England. Wallace never wavered in his belief that smallpox vaccination was useless and likely dangerous. Six years before his death, the anti-vaccinationists successfully secured a conscience clause that effectively dismantled the compulsory vaccination laws. Several other important Victorian scientists joined Wallace in the fight to repeal compulsory vaccination arguing that widely (...)
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  • Fashioning and Demarcation of the Danish Chemical Community in the 19th Century.Anita Kildebaek Nielsen - 2007 - Centaurus 49 (3):199-226.
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  • Resister’s Logic: The Anti-Vaccination Arguments of Alfred Russel Wallace and Their Role in the Debates Over Compulsory Vaccination in England, 1870–1907.Martin Fichman & Jennifer E. Keelan - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (3):585-607.
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  • Illustrating Natural History: Images, Periodicals, and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Scientific Communities.Geoffrey Belknap - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (3):395-422.
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  • A Victorian Extinction: Alfred Newton and the Evolution of Animal Protection.Henry Cowles - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (4):695-714.
    The modern concept of extinction emerged in the Victorian period, though its chief proponent is seldom remembered today. Alfred Newton, for four decades the professor of zoology and comparative anatomy at Cambridge, was an expert on rare and extinct birds as well as on what he called ‘the exterminating process'. Combining traditional comparative morphology with Darwinian natural selection, Newton developed a particular sense of extinction that helped to shape contemporary, and subsequent, animal protection. Because he understood extinction as a process (...)
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  • A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW]Jim Endersby - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward or (...)
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  • A Question of Merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the ‘Concussion’ Over the Edinburgh Chair of Botany.Richard Bellon - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (1):25-54.
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  • Physiology or Psychic Powers? William Carpenter and the Debate Over Spiritualism in Victorian Britain.Shannon Delorme - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:57-66.
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