Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Reflections on the Metavirtue of Sensitivity to Suffering.Cheshire Calhoun - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):182-188.
  • Expecting Bad Luck.Lisa Tessman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):9-28.
    This paper draws on Claudia Card’s discussions of moral luck to consider the complicated moral life of people—described as pessimists—who accept the heavy knowledge of the predictability of the bad moral luck of oppression. The potential threat to ethics posed by this knowledge can be overcome by the pessimist whose resistance to oppression, even in the absence of hope, expresses a sense of still having a ‘‘claim’’ on flourishing despite its unattainability under oppression.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Idealizing Morality.Lisa Tessman - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):797 - 824.
    Implicit in feminist and other critiques of ideal theorizing is a particular view of what normative theory should be like. Although I agree with the rejection of ideal theorizing that oppression theorists (and other theorists of justice) have advocated, the proposed alternative of nonideal theorizing is also problematic. Nonideal theorizing permits one to address oppression by first describing (nonideal) oppressive conditions, and then prescribing the best action that is possible or feasible given the conditions. Borrowing an insight from the "moral (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Trust, Distrust and Commitment.Katherine Hawley - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1):1-20.
    I outline a number of parallels between trust and distrust, emphasising the significance of situations in which both trust and distrust would be an imposition upon the (dis)trustee. I develop an account of both trust and distrust in terms of commitment, and argue that this enables us to understand the nature of trustworthiness. Note that this article is available open access on the journal website.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Trust and Belief: A Preemptive Reasons Account.Arnon Keren - 2014 - Synthese 191 (12):2593-2615.
    According to doxastic accounts of trust, trusting a person to \(\varPhi \) involves, among other things, holding a belief about the trusted person: either the belief that the trusted person is trustworthy or the belief that she actually will \(\varPhi \) . In recent years, several philosophers have argued against doxastic accounts of trust. They have claimed that the phenomenology of trust suggests that rather than such a belief, trust involves some kind of non-doxastic mental attitude towards the trusted person, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Trust, Hope and Empowerment.Victoria McGeer - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):237 – 254.
    Philosophers and social scientists have focussed a great deal of attention on our human capacity to trust, but relatively little on the capacity to hope. This is a significant oversight, as hope and trust are importantly interconnected. This paper argues that, even though trust can and does feed our hopes, it is our empowering capacity to hope that significantly underwrites—and makes rational—our capacity to trust.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  • Autonomy, Universality, and Playing the Guitar: On the Politics and Aesthetics of Contemporary Feminist Deployments of the “Master's Tools”.Robin M. James - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (2):77-100.
    Some feminists have argued that the “master's tools” cannot be utilized for feminist projects. When read through the lens of non-ideal theory, Judith Butler's reevaluation of “autonomy” and “universality” and Peaches's engagement with guitar rock are instances in which implements of patriarchy are productively repurposed for feminist ends. These examples evince two criteria whereby one can judge the success of such an attempt: first, accessibility and efficacy; second, that the use is deconstructive of its own conditions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Trust, Testimony, and Prejudice in the Credibility Economy.Gerald Marsh - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):280-293.
    In this paper I argue for a special kind of injustice I call “trust injustice.” Taking Miranda Fricker's work on epistemic injustice as my starting point, I argue that there are some ethical constraints on trust relationships. If I am right about this, then we sometimes have duties to maintain trust relationships that are independent of the social roles we play.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Marguerite La Caze - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Analyzing Oppression. By ANN E. CUDD.Paul Benson - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):178-181.
  • The Cognitive Attitude of Rational Trust.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2014 - Synthese 191 (9).
    I provide an account of the cognitive attitude of trust that explains the role trust plays in the planning of rational agents. Many authors have dismissed choosing to trust as either impossible or irrational; however, this fails to account for the role of trust in practical reasoning. A can have therapeutic, coping, or corrective reasons to trust B to ${\phi}$ , even in the absence of evidence that B will ${\phi}$ . One can choose to engage in therapeutic trust to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Relational Remembering and Oppression.Christine M. Koggel - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):493-508.
    This paper begins by discussing Sue Campbell's account of memory as she first developed it in Relational Remembering: Rethinking the Memory Wars and applied it to the context of the false memory debates. In more recent work, Campbell was working on expanding her account of relational remembering from an analysis of personal rememberings to activities of public rememberings in contexts of historic harms and, specifically, harms to Aboriginals and their communities in Canada. The goal of this paper is to draw (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Observer Perspective and Acentred Memory: Some Puzzles About Point of View in Personal Memory.John Sutton - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (1):27-37.
    Sometimes I remember my past experiences from an ‘observer’ perspective, seeing myself in the remembered scene. This paper analyses the distinction in personal memory between such external observer visuospatial perspectives and ‘field’ perspectives, in which I experience the remembered actions and events as from my original point of view. It argues that Richard Wollheim’s related distinction between centred and acentred memory fails to capture the key phenomena, and criticizes Wollheim’s reasons for doubting that observer ‘memories’ are genuine personal memories. Since (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Limitations of Virtue Ethics in the Social Professions.Derek Clifford - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (1):2-19.
  • Trust, Social Norms, and Motherhood.Amy Mullin - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):316–330.
  • Ethics, Politics and the Social Professions: Reading Iris Marion Young.Derek Clifford - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):36-53.
    This paper seeks to describe and evaluate the work of the late Iris Marion Young as a critical reference point for values and ethics in the social professions. Her credentials are both experiential and theoretical, having studied analytical then postmodern and phenomenological thought, publishing a series of influential books on political and ethical concepts from a critical feminist position. Her theory and practice were closely related: she actively campaigned for feminist and related social causes for many years. The aim is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Our Faithfulness to the Past: Reconstructing Memory Value.Sue Campbell - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):361 – 380.
    The reconstructive turn in memory theory challenges us to provide an account of successful remembering that is attentive to the ways in which we use memory, both individually and socially. I investigate conceptualizations of accuracy and integrity useful to memory theorists and argue that faithful recollection is often a complex epistemological/ethical achievement.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Oppression and Professional Ethics.Derek Clifford - 2016 - Ethics and Social Welfare 10 (1):4-18.