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Relativism, rationalism and the sociology of knowledge

In Martin Hollis & Steven Lukes (eds.), Rationality and Relativism. Blackwell (1982)

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  1. Sobre la identidad del sujeto en la institucionalización de las teorías científicas.Sergio H. Orozco Echeverri - 2014 - Estudios de Filosofía 49:49-66.
    Los estudios sociales de la ciencia y, en particular, la sociología del conocimiento científico, han criticado las filosofías de la ciencia por fundarse en epistemologías centradas en el individuo como sujeto de conocimiento, en detrimento de análisis que den cuenta de las comunidades científicas; una explicación del conocimiento científico centrada en el individuo es incapaz de dar cuenta de las tradiciones y actual estado de la ciencia. Este artículo sostiene, sin embargo, que la SSK no diluye el sujeto en la (...)
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  • Disciplinary Authority and Accountability in Scientific Practice and Learning.Michael Ford - 2008 - Science Education 92 (3):404-423.
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  • A Problem for Goldman on Rationality.Francis Jeffry Pelletier - 2000 - Social Epistemology 14 (4):239 – 245.
    The central concern of Knowledge in a Social World is to restore the notion of Truth to the rightful place of glory that it had before the onslaught of those pragmatic, cultural-studying, social constructing, critical legalistic and feministic postmodernists (PoMo’s, for short). As G sees it, these PoMo’s have never put forward any “real” arguments for their veriphobia; and, well, how could they, since their position is committed to the “denial of Truth” and hence committed to denying that there is (...)
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  • Mental Models or Formal Rules?Philip N. Johnson-Laird & Ruth M. J. Byrne - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):368-380.
  • More Models Just Means More Difficulty.N. E. Wetherick - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):367-368.
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  • Scientific Thinking and Mental Models.Ryan D. Tweney - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):366-367.
  • Models, Rules and Expertise.Rosemary J. Stevenson - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):366-366.
  • Unjustified Presuppositions of Competence.Leah Savion - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):364-365.
  • Nonsentential Representation and Nonformality.Keith Stenning & Jon Oberlander - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):365-366.
  • There is No Need for Mental Models to Map Onto Formal Logic.Paul Pollard - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):363-364.
  • Mental Models, More or Less.Thad A. Polk - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):362-363.
  • Deduction and Degrees of Belief.David Over - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):361-362.
  • Do Mental Models Provide an Adequate Account of Syllogistic Reasoning Performance?Stephen E. Newstead - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):359-360.
  • Mental Models and the Tractability of Everyday Reasoning.Mike Oaksford - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):360-361.
  • Situation Theory and Mental Models.Alice G. B. ter Meulen - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):358-359.
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  • Models for Deontic Deduction.K. I. Manktelow - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):357-357.
  • Visualizing the Possibilities.Bruce J. MacLennan - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):356-357.
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  • Gestalt Theory, Formal Models and Mathematical Modeling.Abraham S. Luchins & Edith H. Luchins - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):355-356.
  • Architecture and Algorithms: Power Sharing for Mental Models.Robert Inder - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):354-354.
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  • The Content of Mental Models.Paolo Legrenzi & Maria Sonino - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):354-355.
  • The Logical Content of Theories of Deduction.Wilfrid Hodges - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):353-354.
  • Mental Models: Rationality, Representation and Process.D. W. Green - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):352-353.
  • Rule Systems Are Not Dead: Existential Quantifiers Are Harder.Richard E. Grandy - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):351-352.
  • A Number of Questions About a Question of Number.Alan Garnham - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):350-351.
  • Why Study Deduction?Kathleen M. Galotti & Lloyd K. Komatsu - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):350-350.
  • Mental Models and Informal Logic.Alec Fisher - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):349-349.
  • Deductive Reasoning: What Are Taken to Be the Premises and How Are They Interpreted?Samuel Fillenbaum - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):348-349.
  • The Argument for Mental Models is Unsound.James H. Fetzer - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):347-348.
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  • On Modes of Explanation.Rachel Joffe Falmagne - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):346-347.
  • On Rules, Models and Understanding.Jonathan St B. T. Evans - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):345-346.
  • Mental-Model Theory and Rationality.Pascal Engel - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):345-345.
  • Deduction by Children and Animals: Does It Follow the Johnson-Laird & Byrne Model?Hank Davis - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):344-344.
  • Tractability Considerations in Deduction.James M. Crawford - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):343-343.
  • Some Difficulties About Deduction.L. Jonathan Cohen - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):341-342.
  • Mental Models and Nonmonotonic Reasoning.Nick Chater - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):340-341.
  • “Semantic Procedure” is an Oxymoron.Alan Bundy - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):339-340.
  • Mental Models Cannot Exclude Mental Logic and Make Little Sense Without It.Martin D. S. Braine - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):338-339.
  • Everyday Reasoning and Logical Inference.Jon Barwise - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):337-338.
  • Deduction as an Example of Thinking.Jonathan Baron - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):336-337.
  • Toward a Developmental Theory of Mental Models.Bruno G. Bara - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):336-336.
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  • Getting Down to Cases.Kent Bach - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):334-336.
  • Mental Models and Tableau Logic.Avery D. Andrews - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):334-334.
  • Précis of Deduction.Philip N. Johnson-Laird & Ruth M. J. Byrne - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):323-333.
  • Relativism and Our Warrant for Scientific Theories.Paul Faulkner - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):259 – 269.
    We depend upon the community for justified belief in scientific theory. This dependence can suggest that our individual belief in scientific theory is justified because the community believes it to be justified. This idea is at the heart of an anti-realist epistemology according to which there are no facts about justification that transcend a community's judgement thereof. Ultimately, knowledge and justified belief are simply social statuses. When conjoined with the lemma that communities can differ in what they accept as justified, (...)
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  • Conspiracy Theories, Impostor Syndrome, and Distrust.Katherine Hawley - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (4):969-980.
    Conspiracy theorists believe that powerful agents are conspiring to achieve their nefarious aims and also to orchestrate a cover-up. People who suffer from impostor syndrome believe that they are not talented enough for the professional positions they find themselves in, and that they risk being revealed as inadequate. These are quite different outlooks on reality, and there is no reason to think that they are mutually reinforcing. Nevertheless, there are intriguing parallels between the patterns of trust and distrust which underpin (...)
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  • Las Guerras Equivocadas. La Ciencia y Su Entorno Cultural.Sebastián Álvarez Toledo - 2017 - Arbor 193 (786):423.
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  • Critique Without Critics?Marcelo Dascal - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):39-62.
  • A Mannheim for All Seasons: Bloor, Merton, and the Roots of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Kaiser - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (1):51-87.
  • Can Relativism Be Reconciled with Realism and Causalism?Barbara Tuchańska - 1990 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (3):285 – 294.
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  • Two Problems with the Socio-Relational Critique of Distributive Egalitarianism.Christian Seidel - 2013 - In Miguel Hoeltje, Thomas Spitzley & Wolfgang Spohn (eds.), Was dürfen wir glauben? Was sollen wir tun? Sektionsbeiträge des achten internationalen Kongresses der Gesellschaft für Analytische Philosophie e.V. DuEPublico.
    Distributive egalitarians believe that distributive justice is to be explained by the idea of distributive equality (DE) and that DE is of intrinsic value. The socio-relational critique argues that distributive egalitarianism does not account for the “true” value of equality, which rather lies in the idea of “equality as a substantive social value” (ESV). This paper examines the socio-relational critique and argues that it fails because – contrary to what the critique presupposes –, first, ESV is not conceptually distinct from (...)
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