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  1. Political Appeasement and Academic Critique.Marcel Wissenburg - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (7):675-691.
    Both environmental social movements and academic thinkers appear to move away from fundamental critique of dominant values in the direction of a more pragmatic approach to environmental politics. This article highlights some of the disadvantages of this development, using environmental concerns to illustrate the broader argument that decent societies aiming for social and environmental justice are best served by the existence of an informed, fundamental type of opposition next to cooperative, loyal modes of dissent. For academics in their inescapable role (...)
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  • Citizens in Appropriate Numbers: Evaluating Five Claims About Justice and Population Size.Tim Meijers - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2-3):246-268.
    While different worries about population size are present in public debates, political philosophers often take population size as given. This paper is an attempt to formulate a Rawlsian liberal egalitarian approach to population size: does it make sense to speak of ‘too few’ or ‘too many’ people from the point of view of justice? It argues that, drawing on key features of liberal egalitarian theory, several clear constraints on demographic developments – to the extent that they are under our control (...)
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  • Should Future Generations Be Content with Plastic Trees and Singing Electronic Birds?Danielle Zwarthoed - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):219-236.
    The aim of this paper is to determine whether the present generation should preserve non-human living things for future generations, even if in the future all the contributions these organisms currently make to human survival in decent conditions were performed by adequate technology and future people's preferences were satisfied by this state of affairs. The paper argues it would be wrong to leave a world without non-human living plants, animals and other organisms to future generations, because such a world would (...)
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  • Sustainable Development, Liberty, and Global Social Justice1.Kostas Koukouzelis - 2012 - Public Reason 4 (1-2):165-81.
  • To Recycle or Not to Recycle? An Intergenerational Approach to Nuclear Fuel Cycles.Behnam Taebi & Jan Leen Kloosterman - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):177-200.
    This paper approaches the choice between the open and closed nuclear fuel cycles as a matter of intergenerational justice, by revealing the value conflicts in the production of nuclear energy. The closed fuel cycle improve sustainability in terms of the supply certainty of uranium and involves less long-term radiological risks and proliferation concerns. However, it compromises short-term public health and safety and security, due to the separation of plutonium. The trade-offs in nuclear energy are reducible to a chief trade-off between (...)
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  • Atmospheric Commons as a Public Trust Resource: The Common Heritage of MankindPrinciple in Dialogue with Duties of Citizenship.Raymond Anthony - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):43-48.
  • Ecosystem Services and Distributive Justice: Considering Access Rights to Ecosystem Services in Theories of Distributive Justice.Stefanie Sievers-Glotzbach - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):162-176.
    As the increasing loss of ecosystem services severely affects life perspectives of today's poor and future populations, governing access to, and use of, ecosystem services in an intragenerational and intergenerational just way is an urgent issue. The author argues that theories of distributive justice should consider the distribution of access rights to ecosystem services. Three specific demands that a theory of distributive justice should fulfill to adequately cope with the distribution of access rights to ecosystem services, and show that Rawls??A (...)
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  • Multinational Nuclear Waste Repositories and Their Complex Issues of Justice.Behnam Taebi - 2012 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):57 - 62.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 57-62, March 2012.
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  • Climate Change, Justice and the Right to Development.Lars Löfquist - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (3):251-260.
    The primary human rights documents of the United Nations claim that every human has a right to development, a right that also includes continuous improvement of each person's living conditions. On one interpretation, this implies a right to a never-ending improvement of living conditions. According to the author, this interpretation faces several counterintuitive implications. First, it seems reasonable that we cannot have a right to improvement without regard to environmental sustainability; improvements must instead focus on well-being, a concept that is (...)
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  • Discursive Democracy in the Transgenerational Context and a Precautionary Turn in Public Reasoning.Genevieve Fuji Johnson - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (1):67-85.
    We should seek to justify, from a moral perspective, policies associated with serious and irreversible risks to the health of human beings, their societies, and the environment for these risks may have great impacts on the autonomy of both existing and future persons. The ideal of discursive democracy provides a way of morally justifying such policies to both existing and future persons. It calls for the inclusive, informed, and uncoerced deliberation toward an agreement of both existing and future persons, which (...)
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  • Engineering Social Justice Into Traffic Control for Self-Driving Vehicles?Milos N. Mladenovic & Tristram McPherson - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):1131-1149.
    The convergence of computing, sensing, and communication technology will soon permit large-scale deployment of self-driving vehicles. This will in turn permit a radical transformation of traffic control technology. This paper makes a case for the importance of addressing questions of social justice in this transformation, and sketches a preliminary framework for doing so. We explain how new forms of traffic control technology have potential implications for several dimensions of social justice, including safety, sustainability, privacy, efficiency, and equal access. Our central (...)
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  • On Firms and the Next Generations: Difficulties and Possibilities for Business Ethics Inquiry.Daniel Arenas & Pablo Rodrigo - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):165-178.
    Despite the centrality of the topic for the debate on sustainability, future generations have largely been ignored by business ethics. This neglect is in part due to the enormous philosophical challenges posed by the concepts of future generations and intergenerational duties. This article reviews some of these difficulties and defends that much clarity would be gained from making a distinction between future generations and the next generations. It also argues that the concept of next generations offers a better starting point (...)
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