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The Liberal Theory of Justice

Oxford, Clarendon Press (1973)

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  1. Discrimination and Liberal Neutrality.Don A. Habibi - 1993 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 11 (4):313-328.
  • Desert, Equality and Injustice.Les Holborow - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (192):157 - 168.
    John Rawls's A Theory of Justice is an extremely long and elaborate work. But despite the length and the elaboration there is at the heart of the work a crucial set of unargued assumptions which need to be challenged. When this is done we are in a position to provide additional support for the critical conclusions of several other commentators who concentrate on other features of Rawls's system.
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  • The Global Distribution of Health Care Resources.R. Attfield - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):153-156.
    The international disparities in health and health-care provision comprise the gravest problem of medical ethics. The implications are explored of three theories of justice: an expanded version of Rawlsian contractarianism, Nozick's historical account, and a consequentialism which prioritizes the satisfaction of basic needs. The second too little satisfies medical needs to be cogent. The third is found to incorporate the strengths of the others, and to uphold fair rules and practices. Like the first, it also involves obligations transcending those to (...)
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  • Economic Equality: Rawls Versus Utilitarianism: Stephen W. Ball.Stephen W. Ball - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (2):225-244.
    Perhaps the most salient feature of Rawls's theory of justice which at once attracts supporters and repels critics is its apparent egalitarian conclusion as to how economic goods are to be distributed. Indeed, many of Rawls's sympathizers may find this result intuitively appealing, and regard it as Rawls's enduring contribution to the topic of economic justice, despite technical deficiencies in Rawls's contractarian, decision-theoretic argument for it which occupy the bulk of the critical literature. Rawls himself, having proposed a “coherence” theory (...)
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  • Brian Barry: 1936–2009.Matt Matravers & Lukas Meyer - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):255-257.
  • In Search of the Reason and the Right—Rousseau’s Social Contract as a Thought Experiment.Nenad Miscevic - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (4):509-526.
    For Rousseau, social contract is a hypothetical one; the paper claims that it is, in contemporary terms, a political thought-experiment (TE). The abductive way of thinking, looking for the best normative pattern in the data, finds its counterpart in the historical abduction in the Second Discourse; the analogy between the two secures the methodological unity of Rousseau’s political philosophy. The proposed reading of the work as a TE shows that it fulfills the necessary requirements put by (hopefully) intuitively acceptable definition (...)
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  • Rescuing Justice From Equality.Steven Wall - 2012 - Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):180-212.
    Research Articles Steven Wall, Social Philosophy and Policy, FirstView Article.
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  • El calentamiento global y la asignación de los costes de las políticas medioambientales.Daniel Loewe - 2013 - Dilemata 13:69-92.
    The article examines four principles of cost allocation (cost of mitigation, of adaptation, and of compensation) for environmental policies that aim to address climate change: “the polluter pays”, “who benefits pays”, “who is able to pay, pays”, and “the equal per capita”. It shows that they are all problematic. A better case can be built by the joint work of only the two principles of “the polluter pays” and “who benefits pays”.
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  • Outline for a Defense of an Unreconstructed Liberalism.David McCabe - 1998 - Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (1):63-80.
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  • The Geometry of Justice: Three Existence and Uniqueness Theorems.Donald Wittman - 1984 - Theory and Decision 16 (3):239-250.
  • Rawlsian Justice and Non-Human Animals.Robert Elliot - 1984 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):95-106.
    In his book, A Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues against the inclusion of non-human animals within the scope of the principles of justice developed therein. However, the reasons Rawls, and certain commentators, have advanced in support of this view do not adequately support it. Against Rawls' view that 'we are not required to give strict justice' to creatures lacking the capacity for a sense of justice, it is initially argued that (i) de facto inclusion should be accorded non-human animals (...)
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  • The Primary-Goods Indexation Problem in Rawls's Theory of Justice.Douglas H. Blair - 1988 - Theory and Decision 24 (3):239-252.
  • Just Caring.Trevor Hussey - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):6-14.
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  • Strict Compliance and Rawls's Critique of Utilitarianism.Thomas L. Carson - 1983 - Theoria 49 (3):142-158.
    provide a plausible alternative to utilitarianism. Rawls gives two kinds of arguments to show that his two principles of justice are more plausible or more nearly correct than utilitarianism. First, he argues that the two principles of justice provide a better match with our 'considered judgments in reflective equilibrium.' Second, he argues that his two principles would be chosen in preference to the principle of utility in 'the original position.' I shall be concerned only with the second of these two (...)
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  • Welfare Inequalities and Rawlsian Axiomatics.Amartya Sen - 1976 - Theory and Decision 7 (4):243-262.
  • Death toHomo Economicus?J. G. Merquior - 1991 - Critical Review 5 (3):353-378.
  • Justice and Sport.Francis W. Keenan - 1975 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 2 (1):111-123.
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  • Rawls and Gandhi on Civil Disobedience.Vinit Haksar - 1976 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 19 (1-4):151 – 192.
    In the first section I compare and contrast Rawls's and Gandhi's views on civil disobedience as a form of persuasion. I discuss the difficulties facing such forms of civil disobedience; the argument that such forms of civil disobedience are redundant is examined and rejected. Some modifications of Rawls's theory are suggested regarding when civil disobedience is justified and what form it should take. Also, I argue, as against Rawls, that the Rawlsian State should, when that is necessary to prevent anarchy, (...)
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  • Global Egalitarianism.Chris Armstrong - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
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  • Cosmopolitanism Versus Skepticism: Critical Notice of Gillian Brock, Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.Charles Jones - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (1):118-129.
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  • Cosmopolitan Regard, Motivation, and Multiple Jurisdictions.Charles Jones - 2013 - Journal of International Political Theory 9 (1):51-62.
    This article identifies some core features of the argument in Richard Vernon's Cosmopolitan Regard: Political Membership and Global Justice and suggests some directions to pursue in defending its conclusions against reasonable objections. I outline the book's key ideas and draw attention to two areas in which Vernon's argument might be open to question. The first issue is that Vernon seems too quick with the problem of motivation, and the second is that his commitment to multiple jurisdictions must be careful not (...)
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  • The Coherence of Rawls's Plea for Democratic Equality.Percy B. Lehning - 1998 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (4):1-41.
    In 1971, John Rawls published A Theory of Justice, the burden of which was strongly egalitarian. But Rawls eventually came to the conclusion that the project of working out a stable, well?ordered society as argued in A Theory of Justice had failed. In 1993, in Political Liberalism, Rawls sought to establish a sounder theoretical foundation for a stable, well?ordered society. Rawls was widely viewed, however, as having given up egalitarianism in Political Liberalism ? the commitment to a fair distribution, or (...)
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  • Rawls and International Justice.Juha Räikkä - 1997 - Philosophia 25 (1-4):163-189.
  • A Diagrammatic Exposition of Justice.Donald Wittman - 1979 - Theory and Decision 11 (2):207-237.
  • Heroism, Self-Abnegation and the Liberal Organization.Christopher Vasillopulos - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):585 - 591.
    Chester Barnard's classic, The Functions of the Executive, is premised on an Aristotelean conception of human nature. This reliance ramifies throughout his analysis of the cooperative basis of human organizations. Perhaps its most important manifestation appears in his definition of willing cooperation as self-abnegation. For by so removing cooperation from its utilitarian and contractarian assumptions, he avoids the well known criticisms of those assumptions while retaining his fundamental liberalism. Put positively, self-abnegation informs Barnard's liberalism with an heroic dimension. This, in (...)
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